GoDaddy's New Hosting, UK LulzSec Arrest, Amazon Worth $100B, Fox Squeezes Net TV, First Mango Windows Phone, Facebook Business

This and more important news from your Fast Company editors, with updates all day.

GoDaddy Launches Next-Gen Web Hoster. Best known for selling domain names, GoDaddy has just launched what it's calling its 4GH (fourth generation web hosting) service, which uses a shared server system in which different websites are hosted across a cloudy server infrastructure with smart traffic adjustments—much more resilient to web traffic spikes. —KE

UK Police Nab A LulzSec'cer. British cops have just collared a 19-year-old going by the hacker handle Topiary, and are busy searching the home of the young Scot. Another youngster, this time aged 17 and London-based, is also being questioned. —KE

—Updated 2:30 p.m. EST

OK Go Goes Chrome For All Is Not Lost. OK Go has released it latest Big Video, this time with an assist from Google Japan, HTML5, director Trish Sie, the dance company Pilobolus and a lot of spandex. The video, for All Is Not Lost, combines dance, text, music and the multi-window HTML5 experience in a kaleidoscopic visual treat (watch for the Human Centipede move). Viewers who visit the dedicated allisnotlo.st site (suggested browser: Chrome, natch) can customize the video with messages that the band will spell out with their feet. —TI

—Updated 12:05 p.m. EST

Amazon's Market Cap Over $100 Billion. Amazon is huge. How huge? Bigger than $100 billion huge. That's thanks to recent upswings in its share price after it reported better than expected earnings. —KE

—Updated 09:40 a.m. EST

Fox Squeezes Net Access To Its Shows. In a move that you could call pushback at the advance of Net video channels, Fox is changing its policies to require online viewers of its content on Hulu and its own websites to prove that they are paying for cable access to the shows (or have paid for Hulu Plus). Only Dish network is a valid log-in at the moment, which may be a limiting feature. After an 8-day period immediately after a show's "real" broadcast, the log-in requirement is relaxed. —KE

Japan Gets First Dibs On Windows Phone. Microsoft's make-over for Windows Phone 7, dubbed Mango, will now officially hit a Fujitsu/KDDI smartphone in Japan first of all. The handset is sleek, waterproof and comes with an insane-sounding 13.2 megapixel camera...and Mango brings multitasking, turn-by-turn voice assisted navigation and a bunch of other features. This phone will help determine if Microsoft (and Nokia's) future in smartphones looks rosy. —KE

Facebook's Business Effort. Mere days after Google began killing off business-related Google+ profiles (and with no "enterprise+" in sight) Facebook has rolled out its guide to help small businesses maximize the way they use Facebook. There's assistance in setting up a page, organizing ads and deals and so on, all nicely wrappered. It's not much—there are no secret extra features you'll get access to, for example—but it's a start. Is it a sign Facebook's getting a little nervous? —KE

Anonymous Hits PayPal, Legally This Time. Proving that a collective organization can change its tactics, hacktivists Anonymous are trying to motivate the public to move against PayPal in protest at its role in helping police make AntiSec arrests. The campaign asks you to disconnect your PayPal account, thus hitting the company where it hurts—although it's unlikely to encourage enough support to be more than a parasite gently biting at PayPal's huge flank. It's also the first "piece" in a bigger campaign to come...But what actions will Anonymous take? —KE

[Image: Flickr user iliveisl]

Yesterday's Fast Feed: Apple Shares Soar, China tightens Net access, EMI Exec Loves Pirates...and more...

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