Note To CEOs: Decisions Come From You, Not The Board

I had two similar experiences last week where I heard from employees of two different companies that I'm on the board of. In each case, a senior exec said something like "I heard the board wants us to do blah."

I was in each board meeting and the board most definitely did not say "we want the company to do blah." Rather, in each case there was a discussion about the topic in question. In one of the cases consensus was reached quickly; in the other there was a robust discussion since two of the board members disagreed and the CEO wasn't sure what he wanted to do. Ultimately in that case as well there was consensus.

In each case I asked the executive what he'd heard back from the CEO. I got two versions of "the board had a discussion, there was a lot of disagreement, but the board wanted us to do blah." I then asked, as non-politically as I could, "Do you think CEO wants to do that?" In both cases, the answer was "I'm not sure, but he knows the board wants that."

I think this is a brutal communication mistake on the part of each of the CEOs. I've seen this many times over the past sixteen years since I stopped being a CEO and started being a board member. In each case the CEO is abdicating some responsibility for the decision. In the worst situation, the CEO is blaming the board for a decision and ultimately setting up a very negative context if the decision is an incorrect one -- as in "see -- I didn't want to do this but the board did -- so it's not my fault."

I've come to believe that the only real operating decision that a board makes is to fire the CEO. Sure, the board -- and individual board members -- are often involved in many operational decisions, but the ultimate decision is (and should be) the CEO's. If the CEO is not in a position to be the ultimate decision maker, he shouldn't be the CEO. And if board members don't trust the CEO to make the decision, they should take one of two actions available to them -- leave the board or replace the CEO.

In one of the cases, I asked the executive "if I told you the CEO was strongly in favor of the decision, would that impact you." The response was a simple one: "yes -- I'd be much more motivated to make sure we did it right." I smiled and reinforced that the CEO was in fact supportive, which I think was a relief (and motivator) to this particular executive.

In my leadership experience, people really value when a leader takes responsibility for a decision, even if it turns out to be an incorrect one. CEO's -- don't be the guy who says "the board made me do it."

Reprinted from Feld Thoughts

Brad Feld is a managing director at Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. He invests in software and Internet companies around the U.S., runs marathons, and reads a lot. Follow him at twitter.com/bfeld.

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