Zynga Files For IPO, U.K. Papers Ditch U.S. Editions, Facebook Winning, RIM Losing

Zynga just filed its Form S-1 stating its intent to IPO. This, and other bits of news from your Fast Company editors, with updates all day.

Zynga Files For IPO. As expected, runaway success gaming firm Zynga just filed its Form S-1 with the SEC in preparation for an Initial Public Offer. Newsy gems in the document include Marc Pincus' salary of $300,000, and the fact the firm's made $235 million in revenue in the first three months of 2011 alone. Casual gaming pays well, eh? --KE

--Updated 12:20 p.m. EST

newspress

[Image of "double octuple newspaper press" via: Flickr user perpetualplum]

U.K. Papers Going For Web Editions, Ditch Paper. The Guardian News & Media company is ditching publication of its overseas print editions--currently rolling off presses in New York, Frankfurt, Madrid, Malta and Cyprus--to save money. The cash is better spent honing the newspaper's online editions of the Guardian and Observer, including a future U.S. edition, but it's also a huge sign that the end of the printed paper isn't as far away as some may think. --KE

--Updated 11:05 a.m. EST

Google Broke Wiretap Laws? Oops. A San Francisco judge has now decided that Google could face lawsuits for its illegal Wi-Fi data "sniffing" acts, even though the company claims it was an accident. Google had been claiming the class action suits it faces were irrelevant because anyone could drive around and do the same, and most of the data was open. Judge Ware noted that "open" ≠ "public" and that Google may have violated federal wiretapping laws. How expensive could this get? --KE

--Updated 9:30 a.m. EST

tycho

NASA's Image Of The Day. It's a very recent and incredible image from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, showing sunrise on the Moon. Sci-fi fans will appreciate it's actually of the Tycho crater, where the events of 2001: A Space Odyssey occur.

Big Names Buy Big Nortel Patents. Nortel went bankrupt, but its core IP portfolio contains enough juicy morcels that many of the big names in modern communications have been desperate to buy its patents. Now a consortium of these names has won the right to purchase, forking over $4.5 billion to do so. There are names like RIM, Apple, Microsoft, EMC, Ericsson and Sony in the mix. Does this co-investment also hint at agreements not to sue each other? 'Cause we've had enough of that. --KE

Facebook Wins Move In Ceglia Case. Facebook's other ownership battle (are there really only two, with so much lovely money involved?) has just developed slightly: Facebook's won the right to actually examine key evidence that Paul Ceglia alleges entitles him to half of the $70 billion company. Ceglia must now hand over a document that's supposed to be a partnership agreement with Mark Zuckerberg from 2003, and original emails between the two. Facebook will be looking for forensic proof they're fake or inaccurate.--KE

RIM Struggles, Very Publicly. Late yesterday a "high level" RIM exec published an open letter decrying everything that's wrong with the culture of his corporation, and RIM felt the need to respond in kind. That was a public enough airing of dirty laundry, but RIM also faced a potentially more serious issue in a shareholder "revolt." The money men had been demanding an executive restructure, and to placate them RIM's now formed a "committee of independent directors" to look into the execs.--KE

Europe To Phone Roaming Scammers: Can You Hear Us Now!?. A new law in Europe to force more reasonable fees from cell phone operators charging for off-network roaming has come into effect--the latest move by the E.U. to regulate consumer abuse. From today operators cannot charge more than the equivalent of £0.10 (plus tax) for incoming calls and £0.30 for outgoing calls, representing a big step down for some. The E.U. has said it even plans to equalize domestic and roaming fees--an incredible goal--by 2015. But will the networks worm their way out by upping other charges?--KE

--Updated 5:15 a.m. EST

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