Fast Company

Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz Is A Digital Bigfoot

Known for her blunt leadership style, Bartz also makes a deep impression online, according to digital footprint tracker PeekYou.

Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz has huge digital feet. That's according to a new ranking out by PeekYou, a company that measures the virtual presence of a person using an algorithm that weighs public information to determine business leaders’ digital footprint.

The more news stories about a person, the more Twitter followers they have, the more connected they are on LinkedIn, the mightier their clout and the stronger their brand, PeekYou says. So it makes sense that a top female CEO is also a VIP in the tech arena.

"Engagement in social media is just one of the factors that we consider when attributing a PeekScore to an individual,” PeekYou's General Manager, Raj Ajrawat, tells Fast Company. “That CEO may not have time to tweet, but he/she may be very active on LinkedIn or his/her own personal blog/website. The difference in the score, while potentially not that large, comes down to the weights and factors that we attribute to different aspects of an individual's online footprint i.e. the number of 'Press/News' links that an individual has attributed to them is weighed differently than the number of Twitter followers that the individual has."

Bartz has, of course, been covered plenty in the news, from being crowned one of Forbes' Most Powerful Women to famously telling TechCrunch’s Mike Arrington where he can shove it.

PepsiCo's Indra Nooyi is not far behind Bartz on the list, along with Xerox's Ursula Burns and Ellen Kullman from DuPont. The full rundown is here.

But when it comes to other PeekScores, female CEOs are not quite stacking up to, say, the tech bigwigs under 30; only Bartz shows up on the list PeekYou has put together for tech hot shots 31 and over. The PeekYou blog concluded: "The fact remains, however, that even at this late date far too few women are ultimately running things…. Few [female CEOs], if any, have all that much of a social media presence, but they’re all newsworthy, and all high profile. As such, their PeekScores suggest a definite presence here in cyberspace, even if they’re too busy wheeling and dealing to tweet their days away."

To help with this shortcoming—and compare PeekYou’s findings to our own choices, we asked them to determine the PeekScore for our 2011 Most Influential Women in Technology. Check out the results below.

PeekYou Individual Listing and Score

Chloe Sladden, Media Partner, Twitter TV: 10.00
Veronica Belmont, Host, Revision3: 9.97
Marissa Mayer, Vice President of Consumer Products, Google: 8.95
Shira Lazar, Host, Partners Project: 8.22
Heather Harde, CEO, Techcrunch: 8.19
Rachel Sterne, CEO, Ground Report: 8.17
Cynthia Breazeal, Founder, Personal Robots Groups MIT: 8.08
Jennifer Aaker, General Atlantic Professor of Marketing, Stanford GSB: 8.07
Kellee Santiago, President, That Game Company: 8.05
Ory Okolloh, Policy Manger, Africa for Google: 8.04
Julia Kaganskiy, Editor, The Creators Project: 8.02
Leslie Bradshaw, Founder, Jess3: 8.02
Carolyn Leighton, Founder, Women in Tech Intl: 7.84
Prerna Gupta, CEO, Khush Inc.: 7.71
Sona Mehring, Founder, CaringBridge: 7.46
Natalie Jeremijenko, NYU engineer & environmental scientist: 7.13
Jennifer Fleiss, Co-Founder, Rent the Runway: 6.98
Rachelle Hruska, Founder, GuestofaGuest: 6.30
Nichole Goodyear, CEO, Brickfish: 6.04
Alisa Miller, CEO, Public Radio International: 5.83
Limor Fried, Founder. Adafruit Industries: 5.79
Heather Kelley, Founder, Perfect Plum: 5.69
Alexa Hirschfeld, Co-Founder, Paperless Post: 5.53
Dr. Robin Murphy, Founder, Robot-Assistance Search & Rescue: 5.35
Katrin Verclas, Founder, MobileActive.org: 5.34
Jessica Kahn, Vice President of Engineering, Disney Mobile: 5.33
Cher Wang, CEO, HTC: 5.09
Telle Whitney, President, Anita Borg Institute: 5.05
Erin Robinson, Independent Game Developer, Adventure Game Studio: 5.03
Jennifer Hyman, Co-Founder, Rent the Runway: 4.74
Mary Meeker, Partner, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers: 4.23

[Image: iabuk on Flickr]

Follow @fastcompany.

Add New Comment

0 Comments