Fast Company

Why Intel Tapped Two Quirky Chinese Wedding Photogs For Its Latest Ad Campaign

Kitty and Lala

Kitty and Lala are Chinese photographers and bloggers introducing playful, modern angles into fuddy-duddy Chinese wedding photos. Now they're part of Intel's global campaign to promo its new-gen Core 2 CPUs.

Intel's officially unveiling the Kitty & Lala promotion later this week, its second in a series of "blogger profile films" it's had produced by Amsterdam Worldwide, an international marketing agency. The film is part of Intel's Visual Life effort to push the second generation of Intel Core 2 CPUs, which are powering new computers from a host of makers, including Apple (as we get to see around five minutes into the short film). The film is, as per the press release, a "beautiful portrait of contemporary China" through the eyes of a pair of young photographers and their studio 80 Impression.

80 Impression's efforts in reinventing traditional Chinese wedding photos are interesting, gently invoking memories of Japanese Harajuku styles. Intel says it's all about "exploring how the post-1980s generation in China combine respect for their traditional cultural heritage with individuality and creativity." The film is, no doubt, intriguing.

You don't even see any mention of how it relates to Intel until far into the six-minute clip, though Intel notes that Kitty and Lala are a "natural fit" for Intel's campaign because they represent a new generation of "young adults with disposable incomes" and an "expansive view of the world thanks to technology." You may question Intel here, considering how shuttered China keeps its citizen's view of the world by strangling technological advances, but the fact that Intel tech has enabled fast processing in Photoshop through advances in processor design is indeed relevant to the story.

That said, Kitty and Lala are probably just as important to Intel as Intel is to Kitty and Lala. China is a growing market, an exemplar of the developing world where Intel's next big market opportunity lies. Blogging is a huge social meme there at the moment. Lateral thinking in creative professions in traditional markets is a compelling business story. Post-'80s kitsch will touch a social nerve in its audience. And so on.

The question remains, however, if you'll remember this when trying to pick out a new PC on Amazon, confronted by an array of almost identical laptops with barely different and baffling specs, some of which are powered by Intel's competitors.

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