Bin Laden's Secret Email System, SEO Is A Headline Buzzkill, Massive Cisco Layoffs, And More...

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Congressman Canton On Quora

Update to our ongoing look at Congressman Eric Cantor's gov2.0 experiment with crowdsourcing expertise through Quora: He's now asking, "What impact would H-1B VISA reform have on your company's ability to create jobs and innovate?" Join in the discussion! — Updated, 5:25 p.m.

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How Bin Laden Emailed Sans Internet

The trove of thumbdrives sacked from Bin Laden's compound reveals a painstakingly slow human-courier system that allowed the late Al Qaida chief to communicate without an Internet connection "...it was so meticulous that even veteran intelligence officials have marveled at bin Laden's ability to maintain it for so long," writes the AP.

SEO-Friendly Headlines Get The Last Laugh Thanks To Google

The ever-present race toward a high Google ranking has editors swapping clever turns-of-phrase for bland headlines, leaving copy desks the world over in a pun-less funk. "People are flat-out less likely to read funny headlines," said Aram Zucker-Scharff, an SEO consultant from George Mason University's office of student media. So, in hindsight, "SEO-Friendly Headlines Get The Last Laugh" was a bad call. This should make up for it: "Justin Bieber Adopts LOLCat From Rebecca Black At Bin Laden's Compound."

UFC To Pay Fighters For Tweets

Twitter addict and CEO of the Ultimate Fighting Championship Dana White has decided to incentivize his fighters' social media habits with some cold, hard cash. Using a competition model (appropriately), fighters will be ranked into categories, and given $5,000 based on criteria such as creativity and number of followers. UFC has been a social media supporter from the start, and was recently the first major sports events to live stream over Facebook.

Cisco Braces For Biggest Layoffs In Its History

Analysts predict roughly 3,000 jobs cut, in an attempt to slash $1 billion in costs (including cutting ties to the much-loved Flip camera). Cisco's last big layoff of 2,000 jobs was back in 2002 during the Internet bubble. Official announcements will come this summer.

Sources: Quora, Yahoo News, The Atlantic, Mashable, Reuters

[Image: Flickr user matthewspiel]

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