Fast Company

Google's Marissa Mayer Reveals Intense New Focus On Products In The Larry Page Era

Google exec Marissa Mayer talked at a conference Wednesday about how the company has changed--and hasn't--under recently installed CEO Larry Page.

Longtime Google executive Marissa Mayer was asked at a conference on Wednesday what had changed, now that Larry Page has moved into the CEO spot.

Her answer: “A lot remains the same,” she said, adding, “The one thing that’s been really good [is that] Larry is very focused on technology and products and that brings this to the forefront. There is more intensity to that.”

She did not elaborate on whether she thought former CEO Eric Schimdt (and now Chairman) did not bring that same level of focus and, if so, what impact that might have had on the company’s products and strategy.

Mayer also answered questions about how her role had changed since the reorganization Page implemented as soon as he took the helm last month. Many observers noticed that Mayer, who was long one of the top players in the company as the head of search and user experience, was not among the people appointed to lead key divisions.

“My role has remained pretty much unchanged,” she said. In October, Mayer shifted out of the search department and took on responsibility for the company’s local efforts. Her title then was VP of Consumer Products. Today, on a slide in a presentation she made earlier at the conference, her title was listed as VP, Local and Maps.

Among the products Mayer is responsible for are Google Maps, Google Streetview, Google Earth, and Google Places.

“I think there’s something really exciting and special here,” Mayer said.

Mayer has previously spoken about, and reiterated today, her focus on creating tools that foster “contextual discovery.” In other words, given how much systems are able to know about you today, via your location on your phone (given your permission, Google executives always emphasize) as well as other information you might have previously provided, like reviews, there’s an opportunity to anticipate things you might need and serve them up to you without your having to do anything. “Search without the search” is how it’s been previously described.

Read also: 7 Ways Larry Page Is Defining Google's Future

[Image: Flickr user Esthr]

E.B. Boyd is FastCompany.com's Silicon Valley reporter. Twitter. Email.

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