iFive: The Wii Successor, Google's Profits, Apple Snags MS Data Center Exec, Color And Fox Pictures, Adobe And Wired

1. Nintendo's Wii changed the gaming world, but the firm hasn't, to date, suggested any information at all about its successor—much needed, as the Wii looks very aged. But now multiple sources are suggesting that the Wii's follow-up console is in advanced prototyping stages, and the firm is showing it to game publishers. The HD-graphics device is rumored to be "more powerful" than the PS3 and will likely sport a non-Wii brand to give it its own identity.

2. Google reported its earnings late yesterday, with first quarter operating profits up an astonishing 54%, off a revenues rise of 29% to $6.54 billion. Profit per share was actually below industry expectations, however, and Google's stock has taken a steep hit (near 6%) in the aftermath. The increased costs Google's incurring seem to be at fault, with its huge hiring "binge" at the start of this year—part of Google's efforts at ensuring its future.

3. High-level exec trading between firms is common, but the latest one has the tech world intrigued: Apple has snagged Kevin Timmons, formerly head of Microsoft's worldwide data center operations. Before working at MS, Timmons worked at Yahoo and Geocities—two firms known for their vast data warehouses. The obvious conclusion is that Apple is ramping up its plans to activate its huge data center in North Carolina. 

4. Social sharing photo app Color has had all sorts of coverage, both positive and negative, since it splashed onto the scene. Now it's earning more because the company is partnering with 20th Century Fox to promote upcoming Reese Witherspoon epic movie Water for Elephants. Attendees at the New York premier will take photos and share them with Color users nearby in a unique "conversation" group. One of the film's producers and some of the actors will also be shooting photos and video as they walk the red carpet.

5. Adobe has been working with Wired magazine since the start of its efforts to embrace an iPad digital edition, sometimes playing cat and mouse with the technology as Apple adjusted its code and terms and conditions. Now the firm is sponsoring Wired magazine so the digital version is free for its May edition. The hope is to promote the app's new sharing and shopping functions, and earn new readers who may stay on past the free period and spend money on subscriptions.

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