iFive: TI Buys National Semic., Twitter Monetizes Fire Hose, Apple Wins Patent Suit, Living Social's New Funds, Google Antitrust

1. Late yesterday the maker's of many a student's favorite pocket calculator, Texas Instruments, said it would buy chip-maker National Semiconductor. The deal carries some clout because it's worth some $6.5 billion, which makes it one of the biggest over the last year, and creates one new giant manufacturer of analog electronics. 

2. As part of its next step of monetizing the trillions of bits of data flowing through its network, Twitter just opened a new access portal to its fire hose. Clients will be able to buy access to the full firehose plus an extensive data layer that accompanies every tweet and sophisticated analytics. Cleverly Twitter's priced the service extremely well: $0.30 cents will get you 10,000 filtered searches per hour--meaning it will appeal to millions of firms who use social network analysis to aid their advertising or customer relation activities. 

3. Apple is the target of an incredible list of law suits all the time, but one just swung in its favor to the tune of $626 million. Mirror Worlds LLC had alleged Apple's Cover Flow graphical browsing system (which was actually an Apple acquisition) infringed its patents, and won the damages in late 2010. A federal judge in Texas disagreed on appeal and has closed the case in Apple's favor, noting the damages were also too high. Apple had questioned the validity of Mirror World's patents, but these were upheld.  

4. Hot-topic firm Living Social has raised over $400 million in series E funding and is reportedly on track to generate $1 billion in revenues this year--putting it at a valuation of around $3 billion in total. As part of the deal Neil Ashe has joined the board, bringing his expertise as CEO of CNET and president of CBS Interactive with him. The news proves there's room for a few big players in the coupon/daily deals game.

5. Google's in the news twice this morning. First it's reported that the search giant is the subject of another antitrust investigation, this time by the FTC which is concerned about the upcoming acquisition of ITA Software Inc. and its monopolistic effect on the travel search business. Then there's news that the freshly-departing Product Chief (leaving because he couldn't meet Larry Page's demands for long-term commitment) Jonathan Rosenberg will be writing a book with ex-CEO Eric Schmidt. It'll likely be a blockbuster.

To read more news like this follow Kit Eaton himself and Fast Company on Twitter.

Add New Comment

0 Comments