Five Lessons in Uncommon Sense From Guy Kawasaki's "Enchantment"

EnchantmentPeople are organic, fluid and emotional, while companies are structural, rational and linear (and, oftentimes, lack a soul). C-suites are acutely focused on the rational, practical, metric-outcome side of running business, with good reason. Oftentimes they do so without a balance and appreciation for the human side of business: people and relationships between people. While there's extreme pressure to deliver practical results, people crave inspiring guidance to grow as individuals and connect with the people they work with and the customers they serve. If people grow, companies grow. If people connect, relationships are formed and magic can happen.

Guy Kawasaki's new book, Enchantment, shares an approach to building relationships in meaningful and purposeful ways. He explores the tools needed in business to build purposeful, passionate and practical relationships to transform results. He lays out very clear examples of how to apply the learning in practical steps to launch a product, purpose or cause. He's reframed emotional intelligence and made it simple for the reader to use these tools to approach relationships in business and in life differently. Guy made the advice practical and relevant so you can apply it in your day to day, from setting and managing expectations to effectively using social media and technology to build meaningful connections with people.

Guy makes a compelling case for emotional connections and, unlike most business books, his recommendations and gentle guidance are easy to adopt. What I really enjoyed was how he weaved in his own experiences and stories in to relevant sections of the book without them being indulgent or self-interested. As a writer, Guy has empathy for the reader, and writes with humor and a tinge of irony. His subtle references to Apple and his general expertise as an entrepreneur, investor and world traveler add welcome and credible breaks throughout the book, without being in your face and bombastic about it. He's done a really nice job of deconstructing a lot of practical issues we face in business and made them about people first.

In today's process-hungry world, complexity and over complication seem to govern the way most organizations operate. I believe the biggest opportunities can be realized, and the most complex challenges can be solved by using a powerful combination of simplicity, common sense and determination. This lens of Uncommon Sense* is what Guy used to teach what are, in my opinion, the most important lessons contained in Enchantment:

  1. Make business personal. Invest time to connect with the people you work with.
  2. Manage your audience's expectations. Whether it's your boss or your wife, understand what people want.
  3. Plan and prepare. Design what success looks like before you start.
  4. Be an amazing story teller. Make the stories you tell interesting, relevant and memorable.
  5. Be you. Above all else be authentic, passionate and engaged.

Enchantment is a personal, practical and purposeful guide for anyone in business and uses real people and situations from a wide variety of industries and backgrounds to support each chapter. And if you like tests, there's a simple one at the end of the book.

* In today's process-hungry world, complexity and over complication seem to govern the way most organizations operate. Uncommon Sense is a term we use at Bulldog Drummond because we believe the biggest opportunities can be realized, and the most complex challenges can be solved, by using a powerful combination of simplicity, common sense and determination.

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  • Steve Giglio

    Author is so right with regard to people craving inspiring advice to grow.

    As an sales/executive development coach, I have dedicated my career to mastering the delivery of advice in a heartfelt, inspiring, objective manner. I believe we all owe each other candor and trust when we are giving feedback. I give it as though the person I am contributing it to will be giving me his/her feedback right after. What's good for the goose and all of that.

    I endorse Guy's statement that when people grow, companies grow. Let's all realize that giving feedback to someone is a special responsibility we have to take seriously and empathetically. When we do that, we can expect the same in return.

    Steve Giglio
    Manhattan