Napkin Entrepreneurs

The barriers for starting a company have come down. Today the total available markets for new applications are hundreds of millions if not billion of users, while new classes of investors are popping up all over (angels, superangels, archangels, and even seraphim and cherubim have been spotted.)

Entrepreneurship departments are now the cool thing to have in colleges and universities, and classes on how to start a company are being taught over a weekend, a month, six weeks, and via correspondence course.

If the opportunity is so large, and the barriers to starting up so low, why haven't the number of scalable startups exploded exponentially? What's holding us back?

It might be that it's easier than ever to draw an idea on the back of the napkin, it's still hard to quit your day job.

Napkin Entrepreneurs
One of the amazing consequences of the low cost of creating web and mobile apps is that you can get a lot of them up and running simultaneously and affordably. I call these app development projects "science experiments."

These web science experiments are the logical extension of the Customer Discovery step in the Customer Development process. They're a great way to brainstorm outside the building, getting real customer feedback as you think through your ideas about value proposition/customer/demand creation/revenue model.

They're the 21st century version of a product sketch on a back of napkin. But instead of just a piece of paper, you end up with a site that users can visit, use and even pay for.

Ten of thousands of people who could never afford to start a company can now start several over their lunch break. And with any glimmer of customer interest they can decide whether they want to:

  • run it as a part-time business
  • commit full-time to build a "buyable startup" (~$5-$25 Million exit)
  • commit full-time and try to build a scalable startup

But it's important to note what these napkin projects/test are not. They are not a company, nor are they are a startup. Running them doesn't make you a founder. And while they are entrepreneurial experiments, until you actually commit to them by choosing one idea, quitting your day job and committing yourself 24/7 it's not clear that the word "founder or entrepreneur" even applies.

Reprinted from SteveBlank.com

Steve Blank is a prolific educator, thought leader and writer on Customer Development for Startups, the retired serial entrepreneur teaches, refines, writes and blogs on "Customer Development," a rigorous methodology he developed to bring the "scientific method" to the typically chaotic, seemingly disorganized startup process. Now teaching Entrepreneurship at three major Universities, Blank is the author of Four Steps to the Epiphany. Follow him on Twitter @sgblank.

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1 Comments

  • Fraggle

    Right, I basically agree. Although I don't know if its quite fair to say those efforts are not a company or a startup, but the basic point is well taken. Without full commitment, you probably won't reach full potential.

    I've actually done what the article suggests, that is I started a small business that sells a an app for iPhone and Android phones. Its been pretty successful but has not been successful enough for me to quit my day job. But its pretty close. In fact, if I had fewer responsibilities (mortgage, kids, debt), then it would be a no brainier, quit the day job, and commit to it full time. For those that can take the risk, the sky is the limit.