Fast Company

AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon Users Get Yap's Free Voicemail-to-Text Service

Ten million people have access to the free app on Android Market. Is it better than Google Voice?

Yap voicemail to text

Yap announced today that it's offering free voicemail-to-text services for AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon users on Android phones. Some 10 million people out there can download Yap's app, Yap Voicemail from the Android Market.

Anyone who has experimented with Google Voice knows the pleasures--and frustrations--of voicemail-to-text translation. If your friend leaving a message happens to speak the purest, most enunciated Queen's English, you get a splendid, crisp, readable transcript. But if she speaks like most of us do--sloppily, haphazardly, in a crowded cafe, and so on--you wind up with cryptic messages that tend to read something like, "Hi sneeze, just about to frog the zoom, thought you should go about the cancel, what, what, okay, call me Jack."

According to its Twitter feed, Yap suggests that it has a "higher rate of accuracy" than Google Voice. It also has a few neat features: searchable voicemail (since text transcripts are saved), and the ability to reply from a transcript directly via email or text message. Yap has been around since 2006, and is based out of Charlotte, North Carolina.

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