An Inside Look at Tesla's Model S

Tesla

This past week, Fast Company visited Tesla Motors headquarters for a look at the automaker's progress on its first mass-market vehicle, the Model S electric sedan. We had the chance to see the Model S Alpha testing fleet, see some of the vehicle's innards, and speak with JB Straubel, Tesla's CTO as well as Peter Rawlinson, VP of Engineering (we also spoke with Rawlinson at January's Detroit Auto Show). Here's what we learned.

Tesla production facility

The Battery Pack

The Model S's ultra-light battery pack (Tesla won't say exactly how light) can be swapped out in minutes with the right machinery. That means the pack could in the future be compatible with Better Place's automated battery swap stations. There are around 7,000 cells in the lithium-ion pack, which has a 10 year life span. The pack provides the Model S with up to a 300 mile range--and the whole thing can be recharged in just 45 minutes.

Tesla production facility

The Motor

The Model S's motor is liquid cooled, which increases its continuous power and allows higher speeds for longer. By comparison, the Roadster featured an air-cooled engine. According to Straubel, two generations of technology from the Roadster have gone into what we see in the Model S.

Tesla production facility

The Front Module

The front of the Model S is made out of high-strength boron steel and is covered in energy-absorbing foam to reduce the damage from collisions. The system also features three radiators, with two side ducts that cool the car and a middle radiator that deals with heat from the motor and battery pack.

Tesla production facility

Durability Testing

The Model S has undergone extensive durability testing, including low-speed crash testing and winter weather trials. "We've driven it into the ground on sheet ice and rotted roads," says Rawlinson. "There were zero failures." The low-speed crash testing also reportedly yielded impressive results. Next up: hot weather testing this summer.

Tesla production facility

The Alpha Fleet

Tesla has a fleet of 20 Alpha testing vehicles. They include one vehicle used for air-conditioning testing, one used to tune noise vibrations, one for winter testing, and one used to fine-tune the vehicle's interior. The Alpha cars are being built at Tesla headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif., but the beta testing vehicles will be built at Tesla's supplier starting in three months. Soon after, beta production will switch to Tesla's $42 million Fremont factory, which will begin commercial production in 2012. The base price for the 160-mile option is $57,400, the 230-mile option is $67,500, and the 300-mile option is $77,400.

Follow Fast Company on Twitter. Ariel Schwartz can be reached by email.

Add New Comment

2 Comments

  • Greg Hunicutt

    I hope Mr. Renauer's comment becomes a true fact in a smaller number of years than I think it will. Maybe if Tesla teams up with Hyundai/Kia? Otherwise, it'll be a long wait for a 30K car like what you're asking for, Mr. Renauer. Those subsidy deals Chevy, Nissan and others had with the Feds are going bye-bye if they've not already left the farm.

  • Jack Renauer

    $42 million Fremont Factory is a little misleading. I think it's still fair to point out that the factory is the former NUMMI factory which I would guess the fair market value for this facility would be at least 1 billion dollars. This place is a city on to itself and is probably 10 times the place that Tesla needs. Toyota gave the place to Tesla ($42 million is giving it away) because Mr. Toyoda loves Elon Musk as he should. Now let's see if they can really do this. My goal for purchase is a $30K 250 range vehicle with a 0-60 at 6.5sec with lots of room for a family of four.