iFive: Google TV Delays, U.K. Blocks All Porn, Facebook's E-Commerce Plans, Apple's Holiday Sales Push, HTML5 Beats Flash Again

There's a new rumor Nokia's going to be making Windows 7 Phones. If true, this is a sign of just how far behind the leading edge of smartphone design Nokia's fallen. Relying on bulk sales of low-margin dumbphones is all Nokia seems to have left. On with the news:

1. According to sources, Google's TV effort is stuttering before it begins--the company has asked its partner manufacturers to delay the introduction of Google TV sets, and not to display them at the upcoming CES show. It's due to lackluster reviews and poor performance of the TV system, and it'll translate into millions of dollars of lost sales.

2. The U.K. government wants its population to stick to stiff upper lips, and not stiff anything else, it seems: It's in the throes of asking ISPs to censor every porn site on the Net. Adults will be able to ask for certain sites to let them through, or to apply a film classification-like ratings system. The rationale is if it's an opt-in system, less kids will be exposed to pornography online.

3. According to reports, Facebook's starting a huge push to turn its network of social chatters, gamers and media-sharers into a vast network of online shoppers. It doesn't look like Facebook will be building much infrastructure, instead relying on persuading big, multinational stores that already have a fan "page" to sell their wares through Zuckerberg's baby. Up next: Buying the kitchen sink on Facebook.

4. Speaking of pushes, Apple really wants to sell its hardware this holiday season. Sam's Club sales have iPhone 4s going for a new low of $147, and 3GS's for $47--making the hottest smartphone tech available at Nokia dumbphone-like prices. Meanwhile Best Buy is bundling free MiFi devices (on whatever network) with iPads, in an effort to push the tablet.

5. Another nail in Flash's coffin: BlipTV (which got 100 million views in October) is switching to HTML5 tech from Flash for its online video streaming service. It's not necessarily about iOS devices either--the company's CEO notes the new code version simply "runs faster."

To read more news on this, and similar stuff, keep up with my updates by following me, Kit Eaton, on Twitter.

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