Modern Muse Campaign Focuses on Female Entrepreneurs

A new UK campaign showcases an alternative route to glamor--business.

As Fast Company kicks off its search for the most influential women in tech 2011, over in the UK the everywoman group has launched its Modern Muse campaign, aiming to show young people that businesswomen are just as glamourous and rock star-like as the celebrities they fawn over on TV.

"Younger women today tend to have a strong focus on celebrity role models," said everywoman co-founder Karen Gill in a press release. "We want them to be exposed to a much broader canvas, to women who have built businesses or are working in major organisations, whose lives are equally glamorous."

The UK campaign aims to reach one million girls over the next three years and will profile successful business women, highlighting the fun, exciting and fulfilling aspects of their careers.

The campaign is being launched by the founder of photo stock company Image Source, Christina Vaughan, and will include photographs of high-profile business women taken by Mary McCartney, daughter of Paul and Linda McCartney.

The campaign team will travel to Universities and schools in an effort to nurture creative young women.

"I got involved because I am only too aware that there is such a fine line between success and failure, inclusion and disenfranchisement, hope and despair," said Vaughan in a press release. "It sometimes takes just one word, a sign or a symbol of hope, to change the direction and opportunity in a young person's life."

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[Image: flickr user Matt Dinnery]

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1 Comments

  • Christine Oneto

    I find the everywoman campaign a spectacularly brilliant and much needed initiative. Reading this article spoke to me in so many ways, as these thoughts have been on my mind for the last five years. I have been contemplating an answer to how to take them 'out there.' I agree: Wouldn't it be great if, instead of following tabloid stories and careers of models, reality TV stars or other celebrities, that young girls and women had some real, head-on-their-shoulders business gamechangers to look up to? Best article I've read all night.