My Favorite 17

When Fast Company invited me to be an Expert blogger on Ethonomics and Leadership two years ago, I had no idea what a great adventure this would be. In over 165 posts, including coverage of two Clinton Global Initiative annual meetings, I've aimed to present you with a variety of CSR programs, the elements that make these programs beneficial for companies and communities, and people from diverse backgrounds who are leading the way in making our world a better place.

I've also sought to demonstrate the compelling case for companies to make nonprofit board service part of their CSR programs, and show that effective boards can transform the nonprofit sector to improve communities regionally and globally. Here are 17 of my favorite posts below.

Corporate social responsibility

  • Corporate Social Responsibility: Leveraging Good Will
  • Freeland's Washington Post Op-Ed Is Wrong: CSR Does Maximize Corporate Profitability
  • Aveda And The Yawana: CSR Chief To Chief
  • Western Union: Remittances Financing Global Economic Development
  • Genzyme at CGI: Global Problem-Solving Gives You A Competitive Advantage
  • Microsoft And Telecentre.org Providing Internet Access And ICTs to One Billion By 2015
  • Making A Difference Through High-Impact Service: Business Executives On Nonprofit Boards

Building better boards

  • The Nonprofit Funding Crisis: An Imperative For Building Better Boards
  • Mixing It Up On Nonprofit Boards: Diversify Or Fail
  • Transforming Nonprofit Boards for Effective Governance And A Better World
  • How To Build A Better Board: It's About The Board Chair
  • Investing In Nonprofits: What Funders Need To Know About Boards

Joining nonprofit boards

Personal giving

  • Building Your Nonprofit Investment Portfolio: Leveraging Your Impact 

Last January, I predicted that "CSR policies will no longer be an afterthought to the overall corporate strategy. We will see a major trend with CSR becoming an integral part of the corporate plan that has the full attention of corporate boards of directors. Companies are getting it that their treatment of human rights, labor practices, the environment, and philanthropic and community engagement can either threaten or promote the companies' civic and governmental relationships, influence consumers, and affect the bottom line."

I also predicted that in "both the nonprofit and for-profit sectors we will see greater attention to board governance, with an increase in expectations and accountability from our leaders."

These are topics that I will explore further. I have valued your comments and feedback, in the comments section below and via email. Please let me know what interests you.

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