The Lack of Women in Tech

The meme of the lack of women in tech (or software, or entrepreneurship) appeared in several places today. Regular readers of this blog know that I've been the chairman of the National Center for Women & Information Technology for a number of years and deeply involved in this issue. It's very satisfying for me to see a meme like this pick up speed and appear in a bunch of thoughtful articles and discussions. If you are interested in this issue, I have three articles from the last 24 hours that I encourage you to read.

Let's start with a high level discussion in the San Jose Mercury News article titled "Startup boot camp illustrates dearth of women in tech." The article does a nice job of framing the issue and the last few paragraphs bring up the idea that the "paucity of female tech entrepreneurs has something to do with what has been called the soft bigotry of low expectations." A similar concept is that parents of young girls (junior high / high school) discourage (or "don't encourage") their daughters from exploring computer science.

Next is a chewy blog post by Eric Ries titled "Why diversity matters (the meritocracy business)." Eric tackles a bunch of concepts around diversity with a focus on gender diversity (although a lot of the constructs are applicable to ethnic and racial diversity.) The comments to this post contain some good additional refinements to the discussion. In reading through the comments, I find it interesting to see how loaded the word "diversity" is as some of the commenters seem to confuse "diversity" with "equal numbers of all types" or some kind of specious politically correct construct. Eric also includes a tremendous short presentation by Terri Oda about how biology (doesn't) explain the low number of women in computer science.

Finally, Fred Wilson's excellent post titled "Some Thoughts On The Seed Fund Phenomenon" has a comment thread started by Tereza that talks about an idea she calls XX-Combinator (a seed accelerator for women).

For those that question the lack of data surrounding this area that is driving some of the current thinking, the amount of actual research that NCWIT has either sponsored, co-sponsored, or done over the past five years is substantial. As with much social science research, there's a big gap between the core research, the conclusions, and long term behavioral change, but as Lucy Sanders (the CEO of NCWIT) is fond of saying, we are five years into a 20 year shift.

Reprinted from Feld Thoughts

Brad Feld is a managing director at Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. He invests in software and Internet companies around the U.S., runs marathons, and reads a lot. Follow him at twitter.com/bfeld.

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