Everyday Objects Stash Money, Secrets, Drugs, IDs

Looking to hide your drugs or money? Yiting Cheng might have something for you.

Yiting Cheng Stash Lamp

Yiting Cheng just finished up a master's degree in design, but she could already teach James Bond a thing or two about stashing valuables.

For her thesis project, Cheng designed a series of eight objects that ingeniously store secrets—from passwords to money to drugs to IDs. And you can see all of them in this nicely shot video (our favorite is the secrete drawer, hidden in the edge of a table, which is only accessible when attach a magnetic pull):

According to Cheng:

This project is about concealing valuables, secrets, bad habits and personal information in our workplaces. Here, hidden spaces/messages were created within 8 general objects such as wood boards, lamps and disposable coffee cups.

How? By utilizing stereotypes and visual camouflage. We make judgments based mainly on our experiences and what we see. This dependency on visual information can create large blind spots. Thus, usual stereotypes of how we perceive solid, transparency and lighting are employed in this project to play with notions of "solid and void" and "true and false."

In other words, she hides things in plain sight, by hiding them inside objects so familiar that you'd never question their integrity. Q, eat your heart out.

Yiting Cheng Stash Docs

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5 Comments

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  • Sam Coleman

    Despite my fascination in design which causes me to spend way too much time trawling design blogs for inspiration and insight, this is one of the most enlightened projects I have come across.

    I believe that, in many cases, design should be quiet and should reflect how we perceive, and interact with, the world around us. This project encapsulates this and so much more. Every product shown here makes me re-evaluate the space around me; space which, before seeing this, I believed I was intimately familiar. It often takes a seemingly simple idea (i say seemingly as it is obvious that alot of thought and consideration has gone into it) like this to make us open our eyes and re-think how we use the spaces and objects around us which have become so familiar to us that they have become virtually 'invisible'.

    As well as all of this, none of these products need any explanation, as soon as you see it you understand it. And I find myself inspired at how something so 'quiet' can provide such enlightenment whilst, at the same time, providing a feeling which is becoming increasingly hard to attain but nevertheless essential to us - SECURITY.

    Thank you.

  • Sam Coleman

    Despite my fascination in design which causes me to spend way too much time trawling design blogs for inspiration and insight, this is one of the most enlightened projects I have come across.

    I believe that, in many cases, design should be quiet and should reflect how we perceive, and interact with, the world around us. This project encapsulates this and so much more. Every product shown here makes me re-evaluate the space around me; space which, before seeing this, I believed I was intimately familiar. It often takes a seemingly simple idea (i say seemingly as it is obvious that alot of thought and consideration has gone into it) like this to make us open our eyes and re-think how we use the spaces and objects around us which have become so familiar to us that they have become virtually 'invisible'.

    As well as all of this, none of these products need any explanation, as soon as you see it you understand it. And I find myself inspired at how something so 'quiet' can provide such enlightenment whilst, at the same time, providing a feeling which is becoming increasingly hard to attain but nevertheless essential to us - SECURITY.

    Thank you.