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Apple: iPhone 4 "Most Successful" Product Launch, Defying the Antenna Critics

iphone cashApple just revealed official figures for the first three days of iPhone 4 sales, totaling to a sweet 1.7 million units. It's not as fast a sales rate as some analysts predicted but still represents huge successes in the face of controversy over its design.

The press release is pretty simple—Apple announces "that it has sold over 1.7 million of its iPhone 4 through Saturday June 26, just three days after its launch on June 24." There's some waffle about the wonderful tech the phone sports and the all-important quote from Steve Jobs: "This is the most successful product launch in Apple's history," he notes. Though the figure is a huge chunk less than the figures some analysts predicted (1.5 million sold in day one) it's still faster than previous iPhones.

Yet what's missing in the press release is any mention of the controversy that appears to be building about the phone's technical design. Jobs does say sorry in the text, expressing his apologies to "those customers who were turned away because we did not have enough supply." There's no mention of the supposed antenna drop-out issues which may be being caused by the metallic edge of the iPhone 4, which acts as the phone's wireless connection to the world. This may well fuel the kind of media story that's popping up in places like TechEye, this one headlined "Steve Jobs, Apple show arrogance over iPhone 4 reception problems" and alleging that Apple's engaged in some low-down nasty PR cover-ups over the matter. Jobs, you see, has apparently contradicted himself in an email exchange with an Apple user, describing the antenna problems as a "non issue."

There are rumors swirling that an upgrade to iOS4 may hit the airwaves today, and go some way (if not all the way) to addressing the problems, and this may explain Apple's apparent "arrogance" on the matter. But whether the media criticizes Apple or not, it seems the smartphone-buying public hasn't been phased by the press fuss yet.

To keep up with this news, follow me, Kit Eaton, on Twitter.

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