Facebook May Use Eventbrite to Monetize Events

Facebook Eventbrite

According to a swiftly removed Facebook page, the social networking giant may partner with Eventbrite to introduce monetized events. That means you can charge an entry fee to the events you organize, and Facebook and Eventbrite can both take a cut.

Some users stumbled onto facebook.eventbrite.com--don't bother going there now, it's been taken down, but before it was removed, Techcrunch snagged this screenshot. It says:

Collect Money for Your Event With Eventbrite

Eventbrite is partnering with Facebook to enable you to collect money for your event. Your attendees pay with credit card and Eventbrite collects the money on your behalf and sends you a check when your event is over. We charge a small service fee for every ticket sold. 5.5% + $.99c, which attendees pay, costing you nothing.

Eventbrite has helped event organizers around the world sell over 10 million tickets. We're excited to help you sell your and put some delightful cash in your pocket.

Facebook had previously used Eventbrite as the ticket service for its F8 developer conference, but this is a totally different beast. Events are one of Facebook's most useful and most used tools, and this is a perfect way to turn that popularity into some cash flow.

Of course, very few events on Facebook actually charge admission, but that might actually change if venues and organizers see a way to do it. Eventbrite apparently also allows for free tickets without charge, though I don't really understand why you'd bother using Eventbrite for a free event at all. Regardless, it's a great idea that could result in a huge amount of money for Facebook, Eventbrite, and anyone who organizes paid events.

Neither Eventbrite nor Facebook offered a comment on the leaked page, but neither ruled it out, either--both said there was no comment "at this time," and any idea that makes this much sense (and potential cash) won't stay quiet for long. As of now, however, this is still an unconfirmed rumor, albeit a likely one.

[Via TechCrunch]

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