Intel's Touch-screen, AR-Packed, Digital Ad Display Almost Isn't Fair

It's not enough for Intel to grab your attention with targeted, customized rich media ads that are smart enough to read the best way to broadcast to passersby. They want you to stop and interact, feeding them analytics about your attention span and spending patterns, too. That's the idea behind Intel's new "7-foot-6-inch multi-user, multi-touch Intelligent Digital Signage Concept," coming to a retail outlet near you. Designed by Frog Design, it's meant to presage a bricks-and-mortar shopping experience as data filled as online.

 

NATIONAL RETAIL FEDERATION CONVENTION, New York, Jan. 11, 2010 – Eyeing a standards-based, interactive digital signage future, Intel Corporation demonstrated a new 7-foot-6-inch multi-user, multi-touch Intel® Intelligent Digital Signage Concept at the National Retail Federation Convention (NRF) in New York. Intel said the prototype device could change the way people interact with digital signage technology in environments such as stores, airports, banks and hotels.

First revealed by Intel President and CEO Paul Otellini at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas last week, the demonstration emulates a virtual brick-and-mortar store setting where customers may use the multi-touch holographic screen to explore merchandise, find out about promotions, submit feedback on products, read customer reviews, view past purchasing histories and share what they have discovered with their friends via social media and mobile phone integration.

Multiple consumers can use this side-by-side window display simultaneously to explore augmented reality-enabled maps of each floor of the store, on which retailers can superimpose images such as coupons and sales promotions next to the product visualizations on the glass, improving the customer's shopping experience.

"As stores seek more competitive advantages over online retailers, digital signage has become a valuable technology for dispersing targeted and interactive content to shoppers," said Joe Jensen, general manager, Intel Embedded Computing Division. "We therefore designed the Intel Intelligent Digital Signage Concept to show that retailers can engage and interact with consumers in a more personal and compelling manner through new usage models such as augmented reality and interactive product explorations, which in turn could yield an increase in revenue and customer loyalty."

More Insight for Advertisers
Intel's digital signage concept also brings a new opportunity for advertisers through the use of anonymous video analytics. As a viewer looks at the system screen, the built-in camera technology analyzes data such as gender and age, audience composition, time-of-day and other criteria, which enable the system to display tailored content and graphics based on estimated demographics. The system anonymously sends audience information to advertisers who can use that information to understand the type of content and messages that are most popular with viewers. This, in turn, helps advertisers target their advertising to maximize the impact on the audience.

Advanced Technology for Siloed Markets
The retail and digital signage markets are continually evolving, and Intel is actively working with other leaders in technology to provide advanced smart solutions that address industry challenges. Traditionally, retail and digital signage application development has been fraught with difficulty as system development requires the use of many different platforms. To address the need for a more streamlined solution, Intel also announced today a strategic relationship with Microsoft* to develop an open-standards validated platform for digital signage applications. "With the Windows Embedded and Intel platform, we will provide industries such as the digital signage market with scalable and interoperable solutions that enable applications with rich graphics and interactive capabilities," said Kevin Dallas, general manager, Windows Embedded Business Unit Microsoft. "With this solution, we look forward to delivering endless possibilities to the digital signage industry and beyond."

The media player platform, integrated in Intel's concept, is running on the recently released Intel® Core™ i7 processor with Microsoft Windows Embedded Standard 2011* platform optimized for digital signage applications. The jointly developed platform is expected to be available in the second quarter of 2010.

Digital signage systems based on 2010 Intel® Core™ processors would also include Intel® vPro™ Technology with Intel® Active Management Technology, allowing administrators to manage systems remotely even when powered down, which reduces operational costs and increases energy savings.

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10 Comments

  • Anonymous

    While looking sleek and cool on the first shot, with every second the video demo got more and more painful to watch, especially with TOTALLY unnatural 30X practised presentational interaction with the screen by the Intel presenters. Seriously guys, do you expect a customer walking into a retail environent to actually spend any time in front of this confusing interface, or actually start browsing the real clothing racks?

    Good intentions, not so good execution in my humble opinion

  • Joseph Allan

    While looking sleek and cool on the first shot, with every second the video demo got more and more painful to watch, especially with TOTALLY unnatural 30X practised presentational interaction with the screen by the Intel presenters. Seriously guys, do you expect a customer walking into a retail environent to actually spend any time in front of this confusing interface, or actually start browsing the real clothing racks?

    Good intentions, not so good execution in my humble opinion

  • astralislux

    This is a bust. With more efficient mobile PCs already in the hands of customer's, there's nothing that will make people use this bloated and artificial interface. As for display advertising, though, it's awesome.

  • astralislux

    As mobile phones and the upcoming tablet PCs take over, interacting with this will be so 2009. Therefore, the display advertising is cool and efficient but the interactivity is dated and will not be able to compete with the mobile tools already in customers' hands.

  • astralislux

    As mobile phones and the upcoming tablet PCs take over, interacting with this will be so 2009. Therefore, the display advertising is cool and efficient but the interactivity is dated and will not be able to compete with the mobile tools already in customers' hands.

  • astralislux

    As mobile phones and the upcoming tablet PCs take over, interacting with this will be so 2009. Therefore, the display advertising is cool and efficient but the interactivity is dated and will not be able to compete with the mobile tools already in customers' hands.

  • Nathan Greene

    Snooze fest video. Better acting in public access programs. The user experience looks confusing and arduous to boot. I wonder what the blue screen of death looks like on it?

  • lara smith

    Intel try to invent good thing. But this has some drawbacks with it. It not working that much efficiently as they say.
    --
    Blockbuster

  • Joel Schneier

    It's the biggest innovation to in-store consumer interaction since the "You Are Here" dot!

    Sounds fascinating, but I wonder if such a cool, interactive display like this would simply cause people to crowd around it rather than do actual shopping. Could be a fire hazard.

  • Blake Callens

    I didn't see anything in that demo that had AR qualities. It was supposedly overlaying the info on top of an image of what's behind the display, but the info had no context to it.