Track Instant Karma

Ever wonder if doing some random act of kindness might inspire others to pay it forward? Now you can answer that question--and track the progress of the supposed ripple effect on a new action-oriented philanthropic Web site called DotheDeed.org. Sure to capture search engine traffic with its sexy-punny moniker, the site launched in December through a partnership with the Wichita Eagle newspaper and the Greteman Group, a Wichita-based ad agency. (Yes, those do-gooders smack dab in the center of family values country.)

This is how it works: Print out a "Do the Deed" business card from the site and fill in a unique 3 to 8 digit code. Then, the next time you help change a flat or shovel a walkway, pass it on. The card will explain to the new holder the intent of the project and how to log the altruism. You can do it solo or as a group--just make sure everyone has the same ID number. In Wichita, even the Girl Scouts are trying it out. The commercial reverberation is obvious: free advertising for the PR firm, free image polish for partners and sponsors, and likely a free exclusive for the newspaper.

So does it work? Consider it a good deed that we have told you all this. As such, we have registered our own Fast Company deeds card (code: FastCard). If you actually use the concept to past cheer on, simply use that code and we'll report back what happened in a few weeks. Take that, Kevin Spacey.

[Via DotheDeed]

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11 Comments

  • Jolene Kemos

    Thank you Fast Company for profiling such an exiting and altruistic movement! I have been a fan of "the uprising of guerilla goodness" with a more established company, Boom Boom! Cards. I'm surprised that they were not the topic of your article. This amazing company launched a year ago, is run by two women, and has proven success inspiring and tracking "intentional acts of kindness." Check it out: www.boomboomcards.com! Boom Boom!

  • Jolene Kemos

    Thank you Fast Company for profiling such an exiting and altruistic movement! I have been a fan of "the uprising of guerilla goodness" with a more established company, Boom Boom! Cards. I'm surprised that they were not the topic of your article. This amazing company launched a year ago, is run by two women, and has proven success inspiring and tracking "intentional acts of kindness." Check it out: www.boomboomcards.com! Boom Boom!

  • Jolene Kemos

    Thank you Fast Company for profiling such an exiting and altruistic movement! I have been a fan of "the uprising of guerilla goodness" with a more established company, Boom Boom! Cards. I'm surprised that they were not the topic of your article. This amazing company launched a year ago, is run by two women, and has proven success inspiring and tracking "intentional acts of kindness." Check it out: www.boomboomcards.com! Boom Boom!

  • Jolene Kemos

    Thank you Fast Company for profiling such an exiting and altruistic movement! I have been a fan of "the uprising of guerilla goodness" with a more established company, Boom Boom! Cards. I'm surprised that they were not the topic of your article. This amazing company launched a year ago, is run by two women, and has proven success inspiring and tracking "intentional acts of kindness." Check it out: www.boomboomcards.com! Boom Boom!

  • Jolene Kemos

    Thank you Fast Company for profiling such an exiting and altruistic movement! I have been a fan of "the uprising of guerilla goodness" with a more established company, Boom Boom! Cards. I'm surprised that they were not the topic of your article. This amazing company launched a year ago, is run by two women, and has proven success inspiring and tracking "intentional acts of kindness." Check it out: www.boomboomcards.com! Boom Boom!

  • Jolene Kemos

    Thank you Fast Company for profiling such an exiting and altruistic movement! I have been a fan of "the uprising of guerilla goodness" with a more established company, Boom Boom! Cards. I'm surprised that they were not the topic of your article. This amazing company launched a year ago, is run by two women, and has proven success inspiring and tracking "intentional acts of kindness." Check it out: www.boomboomcards.com! Boom Boom!

  • Jolene Kemos

    Thank you Fast Company for profiling such an exiting and altruistic movement! I have been a fan of "the uprising of guerilla goodness" with a more established company, Boom Boom! Cards. I'm surprised that they were not the topic of your article. This amazing company launched a year ago, is run by two women, and has proven success inspiring and tracking "intentional acts of kindness." Check it out: www.boomboomcards.com! Boom Boom!

  • Jolene Kemos

    Thank you Fast Company for profiling such an exiting and altruistic movement! I have been a fan of "the uprising of guerilla goodness" with a more established company, Boom Boom! Cards. I'm surprised that they were not the topic of your article. This amazing company launched a year ago, is run by two women, and has proven success inspiring and tracking "intentional acts of kindness." Check it out: www.boomboomcards.com! Boom Boom!

  • Jolene Kemos

    Thank you Fast Company for profiling such an exiting and altruistic movement! I have been a fan of "the uprising of guerilla goodness" with a more established company, Boom Boom! Cards. I'm surprised that they were not the topic of your article. This amazing company launched a year ago, is run by two women, and has proven success inspiring and tracking "intentional acts of kindness." Check it out: www.boomboomcards.com! Boom Boom!

  • Nancy Ross

    Call me old fashioned. I was taught that it is not proper to brag or otherwise talk about one's efforts toward philanthropy. My parents and grandparents said the highest form of philanthropy comes in anonymity.