China's New Train Is Faster Than a Speeding Bullet

china train

China's new train is the fastest in the world, traveling at an average speed of 217 miles per hour. Passengers making the 663 mile trek from central China to south China will see their trip time cut from six hours to just two hours and 45 minutes—roughly the time it takes to get from, say, Coney Island to the Bronx on the MTA in NYC.

The trains are being developed by Bombardier and Siemens, and are part of China's $300 billion investment in a nationwide passenger-rail network (which includes the purchase of 80 super-fast trains). The resulting ticket prices will be nearly five times the cost of seats on slower trains, and economists have expressed concern that China will not be able to recover the costs of the project.

Still, we can't help but be reminded of how slow train travel is in the US. China's new train has maximum speeds of 245 mph. And while significantly lower, competitors' speeds—France, Germany, and Japan all hover around 150 mph—are still considerably higher than the average train speed in the U.S., at just 70 mph.

A train with those speeds would take passengers in the U.S. from New York to Chicago in just three and a half hours, Inhabitat points out—that trip currently takes 19 hours, according to Amtrak. An 82% decrease in travel time? Sign us up.

[Inhabitat via CleanTechnica]

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6 Comments

  • Michael Sebetich

    I already have a way to get from New York to Chicago in 3 hours, it's called an airplane and it costs under $200 round trip. Why subsidize another form of transportation that is incapable of sustaining itself economically?

  • Marcus

    I pretty sure that advancement like this one is presented at the bottom list of their (USA) priorities since they are too busy with other stuffs, as we all know. I'm quite curious how much will be the fare rate for each passenger when he/she opt to ride here? Well, considering fare might be double compared to normal fare when a passenger ride in taxi or gasoline rate when a person use his/her own car.

    Mark

  • Corvida Raven

    I agree Thom and wonder what's stopping the U.S. from making the same advancements. However, considering the price tag, I highly doubt we have it in our budget at this point in time.

  • Thom Mitchell

    The Acela Northeast is Amtrack's most (and almost only) profitable train line - and it barely averages 60 miles an hour (although it goes faster in a few stretches). Almost all of Amtrack other (slower) trains lose money. Imagine how many people would travel by train if they could travel by train between NY and Chicago in 5 hours or less and actually be in the city, not facing another 45 minutes by taxi to get to downtown. Or travel from Atlanta to DC in 3 hours by train. We subsidize highways and air travel - why can't we figure out how to pay for, build and deploy trains like these?

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    Thom Mitchell
    http://www.ThomMitchell.com

  • Richard Geller

    It's long past the time when we should have started implementing a national high-speed rail system, and I confess I wince a little when I read about these developments in other countries. What keeps us from moving forward on what would seem a no-brainer?
    --
    Richard Geller
    http://www.aSiteAboutSomething...

  • Richard Geller

    It's long past the time when we should have started implementing a national high-speed rail system, and I confess I wince a little when I read about these developments in other countries. What keeps us from moving forward on what would seem a no-brainer?
    --
    Richard Geller
    http://www.aSiteAboutSomething...