Infographic of the Day: The NFL All-Criminal 1st Team

The assorted crimes and professional accomplishments of players still on the field.

NFL Criminals

The NFL playoffs are almost here! The New Orleans Saints and Indianapolis Colts might both go undefeated and meet in the Super Bowl! Also: There are criminals all over the field! Still!

To that point, Infojocks created these fantastic infographics detailing the "All-Criminal 1st Team" for offense and defense. Unlike previous attempts to make such lists, this one includes only players from recent years--and it shows both their crimes and professional awards. Many of them are still playing now. And if actually assembled these teams, they'd be pretty good--particularly the defense.

NFL Criminals

[Infojocks via SimpleComplexity]

Editor's Note: After we posted this piece, news broke that Chris Henry had died in what looked initially like an accident--circumstances are still being investigated. As sad as it is that Henry lost his life way too soon, none of the facts behind this piece have changed. And it's notable that no one rushed to point out how Henry had reformed his life until after he lost it. The timing is unfortunate, we admit. But we don't do knee-jerk reactions here, and it seemed odd to pull this down, to try to pretend we never posted it. You're all smarter than that. -TG

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25 Comments

  • Allan Bashah

    I would think that Donte Stallworth's transgressions were far worse than Henry's. What abbout Rae Carruth?

  • Anonymous

    This was an unnecessary article that provided no useful value to readers before Henry's death as it is just regurgitation of an old beaten down topic that brings no new insight. Now it is despicable and no "Editor's Note" washes away culpability. I agree to an extent that once something is published it should remain published, but in this case I think FastCompany should take down the post and on this URL replace it with something along the lines of: "Due to further review this post was removed as it did not align with FastCompany's mission to provide an informative, high standard of journalism. Thank you."

    I expect so much more out of FastCompany. Clearly sports reporting (or at least the NFL) is an area of weakness for the publication because your post on redesigning some NFL helmets was nearly as embarrassing. While a bit subjective the new helmet designs were a joke that looked like something out of the USFL.

    These two posts were glaringly bad by a publication I hold to such a high standard. If you do not get the NFL, please avoid righting about it. Thanks.

  • Sean McBean

    I am not trying to say he should be free from criticism nor am I trying to say anyone should forget the many laws he broke in his past. I also fully understand that this is not centering on C.Henry in any way. My only point was that at this particular time it would show some humanity to not have him listed in an article that describes the players and dangerous and idiotic. Even though he has passed he is still responsible for his past actions but it was troubling me to see a young man who in recent months had stayed clean, obeyed the law and gotten his family back together only to pass on so young. My only point was an attempt to focus on the positive aspects of a troubled life cut short. I was affected by Chris's death as he is the same age as I am and it just shocked me to see him listed there. In no way do I think the article is incorrect just unfortunately timed....either way RIP Chris Henry and let's remember the man he was trying to be also.

  • Robert Mansolillo

    Is it inappropriate and insensitive to criticize all of the players in the diagram, or just Henry because he is no longer with us?

  • Cliff Kuang

    @Sean--Frankly, it's worth remembering that we had this infographic up before new of the death happened. And the graphic doesn't not, as you try to imply, focus on one person--not even close. He's merely one part of a graphic that was created in November.

  • Sean McBean

    If you are at all in touch with your readers, you will see that 6 out of 7 of their comments agree with me. Maybe it's time for your magazine to get off your high horse and admit this article is innapropriate and insensitive at this time and take it down. Cmon Fast Company, to use your own words "You're smarter than that"

  • Sean McBean

    Isn't it just so easy to dismiss a relevant argument by saying someone is playing the race card. If you dont think that this issue was involved before my comment then you are acting ignorant of how the mass media portrays these athletes in America. Many people have amassed a number of arrests in their life but they do not read out their criminal record during the funeral while standing in front of the casket. The important fact here is being sensitive to those who cared about this young man and allowing the positive strides to be remembered, not just the mis-steps. This magazine is the only source in the media that is focusing only on his past sins and not on the fact that he was a shy soft spoken young man who had made tremendous improvement in fighting his personal demons. I was addrssing my comments to the people responsible for the writing, posting, and subsequent lack of removal of this article. I am very perturbed by this and subsequently struck out in anger by condemning all involved by using the "you people" terminology which was a mistake but this was a young man who had changed his life and that should be pointed out along with some basic respect for the deceased.

  • Tyler Gray

    Three helpful hints for recklessly playing the race card: 1. Try not to introduce a stereotype into the discussion that wasn't actually there before you got involved -- it actually makes you sound like the racist. 2. Pick a symbol for your argument that isn't both a multimillionaire AND a convict who amassed so many arrests on charges ranging from drugs to weapons to assault that a judge declared him a "one-man crime wave" -- there are, sadly, many other victims of racism to help make your point. 3. Avoid the "you people" construction, at least in the very same sentence where you allege racism -- it's too easy to misinterpret this as hypocrisy. Thanks for your comments.

  • Sean McBean

    Facts ARE facts and it is indisputable that Henry made mistakes and broke the law. However the editor is completely clued out that people were not talking about Henry's strides to help his life. Before he was injured actual football fans, not high-horse riding so called design guru's, were all buzzing about this kid getting his act together. Facts are facts so I am sure if any of your family passed you would be fine with someone standing at the Eulogy and listing all of their mistakes and calling them Dangerous and Idiotic, right??? You people are disgusting and insensitive and only aiding the incorrect stereotype that all we should see when we see young african american athletes is a criminal, not a human, a fiance, and a father. Disgusting. I thought this publication was held to a higher standard. Shame on you people. Let him rest in peace for God's sake.

  • Robert Caldera

    What bad timing for this. Looks like it was posted yesterday morning before he died but that only means that Fast Company had more than enough time to pull it before it went out in mass as one of the headlines in their daily e-mail. Fast Company, you should pull this right away. Chris Henry may have been one of the NFL's biggest law breakers but the current narrative out there on him now was that he had reformed and was putting his life back together. This looks bad.

  • Chris Nicholson

    I'd like to nominate this for inclusion in the "Really Poor Timing" Infographic of the Day.

  • Chris Nicholson

    Wow ... I'd like to nominate this for inclusion in the "Really Poor Timing" Infographic of the Day.

  • Chris Nicholson

    Wow ... I'd like to nominate this for inclusion in the "Really Poor Timing" Infographic of the Day.

  • Chris Nicholson

    Wow ... I'd like to nominate this for inclusion in the "Really Poor Timing" Infographic of the Day.

  • Chris Nicholson

    Wow ... I'd like to nominate this for inclusion in the "Really Poor Timing" Infographic of the Day.