GM: Don't Worry, the Volt Will Arrive on Time

volt

The Chevy Volt is an electric car plagued by nagging problems, with rumors as late as June that the vehicle might not even make it into production. But even as GM reports losses of $1.2 billion, the company wants us all to know that the Volt is on track for its November 2010 release dates—and most of the car's kinks have already been worked out.

Among the Volt engineers' biggest challenges: cutting down on road noise in electric mode, lengthening battery life, and making sure the Volt's battery could still run in extremely hot and cold climates. GM is so confident that its new batteries are up to snuff that it believes it will have big a competitive advantage over other EVs. That's a surprising amount of bluster for a company that was berated by the Presidential Task Force on the Auto Industry earlier this year for being a whole generation behind Toyota on green powertrain development.

Admittedly, GM still has some work to do before the Volt can go into production. The Volt's engineering team is still trying to figure out the optimal size for the Volt's fuel tank, and the vehicle's 440-pound battery pack is a little heavier than GM would like. And of course, the Volt's $30,000-$40,000 price tag could use some work as well. But if a major auto company can actually make a decent product with the government's stimulus funds, we're all for it.

[Via Autobloggreen]

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11 Comments

  • Gerry Wright

    "Admittedly, GM still has some work to do before the Volt can go into production."

    The writer would also benefit from being knowledgable about the subject too. 80 Volts are already running on the street and at the GM Proving Grounds every day. They are being tested, evaluated, and refined for production. If you knew anything about product development you would understand the process and how products are designed, developed, tested, in preparation for production. All this means the size of the fuel tank has been settled and the weight of the battery pack is what it is.

  • Gerry Wright

    "Admittedly, GM still has some work to do before the Volt can go into production."

    The writer would also benefit from being knowledgable about the subject too. 80 Volts are already running on the street and at the GM Proving Grounds every day. They are being tested, evaluated, and refined for production. If you knew anything about product development you would understand the process and how products are designed, developed, tested, in preparation for production. All this means the size of the fuel tank has been settled and the weight of the battery pack is what it is.

  • Gerry Wright

    Adam and Jensen would be well served to get their facts and data stright before posting comments that are erroneous or lack and substance and validity to them. Their ignorance is rather obvious. The Volt WILL be on time and it will perform as it is supposed to.

  • Gerry Wright

    "But if a major auto company can actually make a decent product with the government's stimulus funds, we're all for it."

    Fair statement and consistent with the fact the Japanese government did the same for Toyota with the development of the Prius. However most of the cost for the development work on Volt was paid for by GM before they were forced to declare bankruptcy.

  • Gerry Wright

    "Admittedly, GM still has some work to do before the Volt can go into production."

    The writer would also benefit from being knowledgable about the subject too. 80 Volts are already running on the street and at the GM Proving Grounds every day. They are being tested, evaluated, and refined for production. If you knew anything about product development you would understand the process and how products are designed, developed, tested, in preparation for production. All this means the size of the fuel tank has been settled and the weight of the battery pack is what it is.

  • Gerry Wright

    "But if a major auto company can actually make a decent product with the government's stimulus funds, we're all for it."

    Fair statement and consistent with the fact the Japanese government did the same for Toyota with the development of the Prius. However most of the cost for the development work on Volt was paid for by GM before they were forced to declare bankruptcy.

  • Jensen Gelfond

    Thank you for the update, Noah! Luckily I revisited the page to see if anyone replied since there's no other way to track the discussion ;) But honestly, thanks for replying.

  • NoahRobischon

    Adam and Jensen - Our new commenting system is nearly complete (we're moving to Disqus). It will be live before the end of the year. Thanks for your patience!

  • Jensen Gelfond

    Adam, the comment system here is completely messed up. I have emailed several times to give feedback on it and have never gotten an acknowledgement that they read my emails, much less are going to take action on it. I'm still commenting here though because the articles are worth it.

  • Jensen Gelfond

    It's all PR and should be taken as such. We should look at the cold, hard facts which include the reality that GM's current lineup is extremely dated, and they haven't put out even a hybrid with technology anywhere near the current market's standards. It suffices to say I am not holding my breath for the Volt.

  • Adam Zak

    "Most of the car's kinks have already been worked out." - Sure, and I've got a new Boeing 787 Dreamliner parked on the runway outside waiting for you to pick up anytime you want. Adam Zak