Hamel: Time for Management 2.0

Gary Hamel's message at the World Business Forum today is that your organization is not fit for the future unless it is fit for human beings. Hamel is a globally recognized expert in business strategy and performer extraordinaire on stage, delivering his message with verve and compelling stories.

He argues that the most important invention of the last 100 years is management, calling it the social technology of human accomplishment.  He says, If you're not spending 80% of your time cultivating your own food, you have management to thank for it. Innovation in management has allowed us to cross fundamental thresholds in human performance.

Here are some snippets from his lecture:

 We have lived in a world where our experience of management has been unchanged. 

The technology of management varies little from firm to firm. That is why leaders can go from company to company and still have pretty much the same levers to push and pull.

Can management change as radically in the first part of this century as it did in the first part of the last? It can and it must!

The signature characteristic of our time is the pace of change. After 13.5 billion years of evolution, change went hypercritical in our lifetime.

The world is changing faster than companies can become resilient.

There are two kinds of change: trivial and deep. Deep change comes most often from crisis. A turnaround is a poor excuse for timely transformation.

Isn't it weird that organizations are so much less adaptable/inventive/creative/engaging/interesting than we are?

The next generation is going to demand a new style of management. For the 1st time you cannot create an organization fit for the future unless it is fit for human beings.

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Stay tuned today as I continue to cover the World Business Forum live from Radio City Music Hall.  

Fast link to this blog: SethFast.com
 

Seth Kahan is a Change Leadership specialist. He has consulted with CEOs and executives in over 50 world-class organizations that include Shell, World Bank, Peace Corps, Marriott, Prudential, American Society of Association Executives, International Bridge Tunnel and Turnpike Association, Project Management Institute, and NASA. He is the founder of Seth Kahan’s CEO Leaders Forum, a community of CEOs working together to innovate through the current economy. His next book, Getting Change Right: Guaranteeing Buy-In from Your Most Valuable Players, will be published in spring 2010 by Jossey-Bass. Visit his other blog, GettingChangeRight.com for more info on the book.  

 

 

 

 

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1 Comments

  • Andrea Meyer

    Excellent point you raise, Seth, highlighting that management is itself an invention. Management is something that we take for granted - we don't apply the same lens to improving management that we do to improving new products or services. Imagine the possibilities (and the multiplier effects) if we focused on innovating management!

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    Andrea Meyer
    President, Working Knowledge®
    www.workingknowledge.com/blog
    @AndreaMeyer