When Robert Greene published The 48 Laws of Power in 2000, a book that has sold over 800,000 copies, he had no idea the book would become a mega cult classic--and not just amongst business types. Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson credits Green's work with his success: in 2008 he was named the #1 earning Hip-Hop Cash King by Forbes, and as an investor of Vitamin Water he also cashed in when Coca-Cola bought the brand. But the single most defining moment in 50's life, he says, is when he completely let go of his fear. Fear nothing, and you shall succeed. This is the basic tenant of a groundbreaking collaboration between 50 and Greene which includes intimate stories from 50's life on the streets and in the boardroom, as well as examples of others who have overcome adversity through understanding and practicing THE 50TH LAW.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Divided into ten chapters, the book, which looks a lot like a Bible, combines a modernist and hard-won perspective with those of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Niccolò Machiavelli on a broad swath of ideas ranging from the value of what the authors call "intense realism"--seeing things for what they are; self reliance; opportunism; authority; to knowing when to be "bad"; and confronting your own mortality.

Robert Greene is the author of three bestselling books: The 48 Laws of Power, The Art of Seduction, and The 33 Strategies of War. Curtis James Jackson III, better known by his stage name 50 Cent, is an American rapper. He rose to fame with the release of his albums Get Rich or Die Tryin’ (2003) and The Massacre (2005). Both albums achieved multi-platinum success, selling over 21 million copies combined. He is the author of From Pieces to Weight: Once Upon a Time in Southside Queens.

Robert Greene is the author of three bestselling books: The 48 Laws of Power, The Art of Seduction, and The 33 Strategies of War. Curtis James Jackson III, better known by his stage name 50 Cent, is an American rapper. He rose to fame with the release of his albums Get Rich or Die Tryin’ (2003) and The Massacre (2005). Both albums achieved multi-platinum success, selling over 21 million copies combined. He is the author of From Pieces to Weight: Once Upon a Time in Southside Queens.

The 50 Cent Bible

When Robert Greene published "The 48 Laws of Power" he had no idea the book would become a mega cult classic—and not just amongst business types. Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson credits Greene's work with his success. But the single most defining moment in 50's life, he says, is when he completely let go of his fear. Fear nothing, and you shall succeed. This is the basic tenant of "The 50th Law," the groundbreaking collaboration between 50 and Greene.

When Robert Greene published The 48 Laws of Power in 2000, a book that has sold over 800,000 copies, he had no idea the book would become a mega cult classic—and not just amongst business types. Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson credits Green's work with his success: in 2008 he was named the #1 earning Hip-Hop Cash King by Forbes, and as an investor of Vitamin Water he also cashed in when Coca-Cola bought the brand. But the single most defining moment in 50's life, he says, is when he completely let go of his fear. Fear nothing, and you shall succeed. This is the basic tenant of a groundbreaking collaboration between 50 and Greene which includes intimate stories from 50's life on the streets and in the boardroom, as well as examples of others who have overcome adversity through understanding and practicing THE 50TH LAW.

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