Lauded for his leather goods since 1854, Louis Vuitton's handiwork has stood as a symbol of wealth, charm, and prosperity; His classic monogrammed Speedy bag becoming the most famous indicator of a jet-setting lifestyle. Fast forward to the 21st century, under the artistic direction of designer Marc Jacobs, LV has evolved into a luxury empire that not only encompasses lavish fashion, but experiments in art, and architecture, as well. In Louis Vuitton: Art, Fashion, and Architecture, the history of Vuitton's world is examined by some of the most elite fashion and art historians, scholars, and journalists via essays and hundreds of color photos of LV products, ads, and other sweet monogrammed goodness. Here is just a taste from this vibrant anthology.

Detail, Eye Love SUPERFLAT Black (2003) by Takashi Murakami. Acrylic on canvas mounted on board , 47 x 47 x 2.3 inches. Louis Vuitton Collection: Gift of Takashi Murakami, Louis Vuitton Museum.

Limited-edition Patchwork Tribute Bag and transparent custom case. S/S 2007.

Interior views of the Exhibition ©MURAKAMI at The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain, February, 2009.

Louis Vuitton Tribute to Stephen Sprouse held at various venues in New York City, January 8, 2009. Entrance of the Bowery Ballroom.

Untitled study (2008) by Richard Prince; photograph, dimensions unknown. Louis Vuitton Collection.

Strap shown of Kalahari GM bag in Monogram canvas.

Speedy bag in Rose Monogram (2009). The canvas pattern is at tribute to original designs by Stephen Sprouse.

Ad campaign Spring 2008, by Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott, featuring (L/R) Angela Lindvall, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Natalia Vodianova, Eva Herzigova, and Stephanie Seymour with bags in the Monogram Jokes pattern by Richard Prince: Mancrazy, Graduate, Heartbreak, and Duderanch.

Marilyn Trunk in the Multicolor Monogram (2007) by Takashi Murakami, containing 33 Marilyn handbags in each of the Monogram’s 33 colors.

The design team at Louis Vuitton (2006), photographed by Norman Jean Roy, on the roof of the former La Belle Jardiniere department store, now the corporate headquarters of Louis Vuitton, 2 Rue de Pont Neuf, Paris.

Close up of stairway inside headquarters of Louis Vuitton Japan, One Omotesando Building (2003), by Kengo Kuma.

View of exterior of Louis Vuitton Nagoya Sakae (1999) by Jun Aoki & Associates. The Damier pattern is etched between the outer and inner walls to create a third pattern.

Detail view of the metal Damier pattern on the interior wall of Kobe Kyoryuchi Store (2002) by Barthelemy & Grino; Detail view of the Monogram pattern inlaid in wood on the interior walls of the Louis Vuitton Roppongi Hills (2003), designed by Jun Aoki & Associates, Eric Carlson and Aurelio Clementi; Maison Louis Vuitton, Champ-Elysees (2005): detail of the Monogram screen flanking the main escalator. Interior design by Eric Carlson & Peter Marino.

Interior view of Louis Vuitton Production Workshop Ducey I (2002), Ducey Commune, Manche Department, France. Designed by Gilles Carnoy.

Maison Louis Vuitton, Champ-Elysees (2005): Women’s shoes department. Interior design by Peter Marino, enclosed by a stainless steel Monogram screen.

LOUIS VUITTON: Art, Fashion, and Architecture, Edited by Valerie Viscardi, Contribution by Jill Gasparina, Glenn O'Brien and Taro Igarashi; Special edition cover featuring the Monogram Hands print created by Takashi Murakami for Louis Vuitton in 2003.

©LOUIS VUITTON: Art, Fashion, and Architecture, Rizzoli New York, 2009. Images may not be reproduced in any way, published, or transmitted digitally, without written permission from the publisher, and must be credited on a case-by-case basis. Serial right are available for LOUIS VUITTON: Art, Fashion, and Architecture. If you are interested in an excerpt, or images, contact Pam Sommers: psommers@rizzoliusa.com.

The Art, Fashion, and Architecture of Louis Vuitton

Under the artistic direction of designer Marc Jacobs, Louis Vuitton has evolved into a luxury empire that not only encompasses lavish fashion, but experiments in art, and architecture. In "Louis Vuitton: Art, Fashion, and Architecture," the history of Vuitton's world is examined by fashion and art historians, scholars, and journalists via essays and hundreds of color photos of LV products, ads, and other sweet monogrammed goodness. Here is a taste from this vibrant anthology.

Lauded for his leather goods since 1854, Louis Vuitton's handiwork has stood as a symbol of wealth, charm, and prosperity; His classic monogrammed Speedy bag becoming the most famous indicator of a jet-setting lifestyle. Fast forward to the 21st century, under the artistic direction of designer Marc Jacobs, LV has evolved into a luxury empire that not only encompasses lavish fashion, but experiments in art, and architecture, as well. In Louis Vuitton: Art, Fashion, and Architecture, the history of Vuitton's world is examined by some of the most elite fashion and art historians, scholars, and journalists via essays and hundreds of color photos of LV products, ads, and other sweet monogrammed goodness. Here is just a taste from this vibrant anthology.

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