Fast Company

Hopenhagen: Twitter-Like Site to Push World Leaders at Copenhagen Climate Change Meeting

hopenhagen Twitter's political usefulness has already proven itself in this month's Iran protests. The U.N. hopes to further its own political goals with a similar microblogging platform on its Hopenhagen campaign site, just launched this week in a collaboration with the International Advertising Association at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival. The open source project, which riffs on Obama's hope campaign, aims to push world leaders to take action on climate change at December's U.N. meeting in Denmark.

Unlike Twitter's limit of 140 characters, Hopenhagen asks site participants to use 45 characters or less in answering the question, "What gives you hope for a better planet?" So far, the site has received 2,394 responses, including "courage and happiness gives me hope", "healthy animals and green plants give me hope", and "the determination of our politicians gives me hope."

While the Hopenhagen site is open to the public now, the U.N. is saving serious advertising firepower for the campaign until September, when it will pursue a more aggressive launch. Hopenhagen isn't the only ad campaign targeting the Copenhagen treaty. Oxfam's Blue in the Face campaign also demands action on climate change at the December meeting with pictures of celebrities and members of the public painted in blue-face.

[Hopenhagen]

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