The architect Adam Kalkin built Bunny Lane on his family's property in Bernardsville, N.J., by encasing an 1880s farmhouse in a cavernous prefab aircraft hanger.

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The interior of Bunny Lane is a mix of industrial hanger, loft and Victorian front porch. The house is on the market for $2.8 million.

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Adam Kalkin hired Albert Hadley, the 88- year-old society decorator, to design the interiors of Bunny Lane. The result is a pleasing contrast of gritty industrial shell and comfortable traditional furnishings.

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The Quik House is a three-bedroom prefab made from six shipping containers. It can be delivered by flatbed truck and installed within three months. Cost: $150 a square foot.

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The Kalkin House on the grounds of the Shelburne Museum in Vermont has a two-story outdoor curtain that creates a patio space. It's used as a gallery for contemporary art and design.

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The two-story Kalkin House at the Shelburne Museum is made from an industrial shell and three steel shipping containers. Oversized glass-and-aluminum garage doors create an indoor/outdoor space.

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Push Button House is a living room that unfolds like an elaborate Murphy Bed to reveal a room furnished with a George Smith couch and a lacquer chandelier.

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The Push Button House was adapted by Illy for use as a temporary café at the Venice Biennale in June of 2007, and at the Time-Warner Center later that year.

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Adam Kalkin created the 4,000-square-foot Adriance House in northern Maine by stacking a dozen orange shipping containers in a T-shape, and he replaced some steel panels with windows overlooking Blue Hill Bay.

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The Adriance House is formed by two stacks of six shipping containers topped by a prefab roof. The result is a surprisingly welcoming interior courtyard.

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Working with students at the Pingry School in Martinsville, N.J., Adam Kalkin created a plan for a refugee village with a modular arrangement of shipping containers and courtyards spaced between them.

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