Even in these tough times, surprising and extraordinary efforts are under way in businesses across the globe. From politics to technology, energy, and transportation; from marketing to retail, health care, and design, each company on the following pages illustrates the power and potential of innovative ideas and creative execution. These are the kinds of enterprises that will redefine our future and point the way to a better tomorrow.

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The year's most successful startup took a skinny kid with a funny name and turned him into the most powerful new national brand in a generation. Barack Obama's presidential-campaign team relied on technology -- what was known internally as the "triple O," or Obama's online operation -- to connect with voters better, faster, and more cheaply than ever before. The team has become the envy of marketers both in and out of politics for proving, among other things, just how effective digital initiatives can be.

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Google may have gotten tougher on revenue-challenged projects and scaled back perks somewhat (people, the free meals are for employees who are working late, not takeout for folks headed home), but the company doesn't lack for ambition. Looking at the breadth of its accomplishments last year, you can't help but imagine that lurking beneath the Googleplex is a secret lab exploding with ideas: Android, Chrome, and even Flu Trends.

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In early 2007, Fox and NBC Universal announced plans for a joint startup intended to shake up the way people watch TV shows online. To which the industry scoffed, "Yeah, right." YouTube had already established itself as the Web's video clearinghouse. Today, that much-derided joint venture, now known as Hulu, is looking bigger and smarter all the time. By adhering to a few core design principles and exploiting its unusual independence, the company created what CEO Jason Kilar describes as a "high-quality, elegant, and crazy-easy-to-use" site. That almost does it justice -- it's also crazy fun.

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Now that Steve Jobs has taken a medical leave, rumors are flying. But if Jobs's own health is in question, his company remains a force to be reckoned with. Here's how Apple asserted its dominance in 2008: the high sales of the iPhone, the emerging eco-system of App Store, the introduction of the MacBook Air, the updating of the MacBook and iPod Touch, the greening of Apple's products, and remaining the dominant player in the music business with iTunes.

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How does a huge, world-spanning business stay nimble? By distributing leadership across the company and encouraging its units to act like startups. Cisco's three-year-old Emerging Technologies Group, for instance, has churned out eight products that are each expected to produce $1 billion in revenue. The group's global business-plan competition recently attracted 2,500 hopefuls from 104 countries -- the $250,000 prize went to a team led by Anna Gossen, a computer-science graduate student from Germany, for an energy-distribution idea. Notes CEO John Chambers: "It can be a $1 billion or $10 billion business for us."

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Chipmakers have long raced to churn out more powerful microprocessors. They didn't pay much heed to heat or battery drain, natural side effects of increased processing power -- until Intel released its new Atom this past summer. No faster than previous chips, the teensy Atom instead uses a fraction of the usual battery power -- one-tenth, according to Intel. Therein lies the seed of a revolution.

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Pure Digital Technologies has democratized video for the masses with its Flip digital video recorders. In just 18 months, the company has sold 1.5 million of its one-button camcorders and now commands 23% of that market. In October, it launched TheFlip.com, which allows buyers to customize cameras from a gallery of 1,000-plus designs, and in November, it released its 3.3-ounce Flip MinoHD. Revenue for 2008 is estimated at $150 million, up from $50 million in 2007.

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As big drugmakers in the U.S. and Europe cut staff, WuXi PharmaTech has been a major beneficiary. A China-based drug-research company that provides scientists-for-hire to conduct R&D, WuXi is growing so fast that this year it expects to employ more chemists than Pfizer, the world's largest drugmaker. In the near term, WuXi is accelerating the development of blockbuster drugs for the likes of AstraZeneca, but it is poised to become big pharma's next competitor.

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Amazon may have started out selling books online, but these days it peddles everything from pickled carrots to two-carat diamond rings. The site logged the best holiday season in its history despite the rough economy. CEO Jeff Bezos credits the $4 billion spent on R&D over the past decade. Last summer, Amazon added a new movie-download service to accompany its MP3 and electronic-book services; the Kindle, its electronic reader, sold more units in its first year than the iPod did in its debut, generating about $136 million in sales; and the company's cloud-computing and data-storage business now counts more than 440,000 customers and 29 billion objects stored.

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In its 30-year history, the global design consultancy Ideo has gone from designing products, to experiences, to transforming systems using a human-centered methodology. Now, the firm is upping the ante, increasingly designing for behavioral change. Last year, it jump-started savings at Bank of America with its "Keep the Change" program. This year, it's taken on some big challenges for clients in energy, government and transportation, working with the DOE, TSA, and CDC.

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When you're as big as GE, it's impossible not to be hurt in a downturn. But the company had good news on its 2008 highlight list too: the three-year-old Ecomagination division saw revenues rise 21% to $17 billion; investment in clean R&D doubled to $1.4 billion; NBC-Universal delivered the most-digital-Olympics-ever, via 2,200 hours of live streaming video.

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Since the garage days of the mid-1930s, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard understood the power of a good partner. Today that spirit of partnership continues to drive the tech giant. HP's 2008 revenues rose 13% to $118 billion, thanks to the purchase of global services company EDS -- and a slew of clever moves. Among them: Collaborating with DreamWorks SKG led to the DreamColor Display and notebook; launching netbook computers with its Mini 1000 and MIE Linux-based "clutch" subcompacts; creating multi-touch systems for use in coffee shops, fast food chains and other commercial venues.

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Ah, to be a cell-phone maker in the age of the iPhone. At Nokia -- which has more than a third of the global market and more customers than its three closest competitors combined -- sales targets are down, the stock price has been halved, and the forecast for the year ahead is gloomy. No wonder the Finnish company is determined to be more than a handset maker. The company's increasingly robust Ovi mobile portal that points the way to Nokia's next incarnation: as a one-stop shop for syncing music, games, and videos.

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Gilead developed the first single-pill HIV regimen, which now boasts an 85% market share, as well as Tamiflu, which is stockpiled by governments worldwide against avian flu. In 2008, it won approval for Viread, a significant improvement in treating hepatitis B. By focusing on life-threatening illnesses, the company has achieved steady growth, despite a tiny marketing effort. Gilead's strategy reaps both financial rewards -- $3.5 billion in profits last year -- and good karma. Its Access Program helps deliver low-cost HIV drugs to 97 countries, and a nonprofit foundation has given $8 million for HIV education, prevention, and treatment.

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Silicon Valley companies are well known for their youthful vibe, yet the more than 700 fresh-faced Facebookers managed to log some grown-up accomplishments between the game days and boogie nights. With the successful launch of Facebook Connect in November the company has taken a significant step toward their not-so-secret goal of becoming the social operating system for the entire interwebs. Facebook swelled to 150 million users by the end of 2008, finally besting rival MySpace and making the company officially too big to fail.

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NextEra has quietly expanded to become the nation's No. 1 producer of green energy from both wind and solar. It has invested $8 billion in wind alone. Its projects include the world's largest wind farm, the 735-megawatt Horse Hollow in Texas, and the world's largest solar-thermal plant, the 310-megawatt Solar Electric Generating System in California's Mojave Desert. It buys more wind turbines from both GE and Siemens than anybody else. Even after bowing to the economy by cutting costs and shelving some expansion plans, NextEra still grew earnings 18%, to $650 million, in the first three quarters of 2008.

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After 50-odd years of talk about its almost boundless potential, the age of pervasive solar power has finally begun. Much credit goes to Germany's Q-Cells, which moved faster than anyone to industrialize the production of crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells -- 150 million of them in 2008, in fact, and projected to nearly double this year. At between 15% and 16.6%, the company's PV cells aren't the industry's most energy efficient, but that isn't the key metric here; cost per watt is -- and Q-Cells is unmatched among PV makers at scaling and squeezing out production costs. That ingenuity resulted in revenue of about $1.25 billion in 2008.

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Though less "efficient" in their ability to transform sunlight into electricity than crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells, thin-film solar technologies of the kind Arizona-based First Solar specializes in are dramatically cheaper to produce. As a result, First Solar -- aka the "Intel of solar" -- has been pumping out cadmium-telluride panels at a radically low $1.14 per watt. Thin film rivals like San Jose's Nanosolar are hot on First Solar's tail, with claims that it can get to 99¢ per watt. But with plans to be producing at gigawatt scale by year end and a market cap of around $11 billion, First Solar has momentum on its side.

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Picture a billion transistors for every human, and a trillion networked objects worldwide, bleeping and blooping every time you flick a switch, make a left turn, or buy an apple. That's IBM's sci-fi "Smarter Planet" vision. Using sensors, high-speed networks and sophisticated supercomputer modeling, the venerable $100 billion IT company is pioneering applications of the same "just-in-time" insight that Wal-Mart has into its supply chain to major global challenges in energy, transportation, food, water, even health care and finance.

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Zappos has made a habit of going to extremes. The online shoe seller gives free shipping on all purchases -- both ways. It has a 365-day return policy, in case you spend months agonizing over those Naughty Monkey Jungle Fury pumps. And new employees are actually offered a $2,000 bonus to quit after a four-week paid training program. "It's best to know early on if an employee doesn't buy into the vision or the culture," says CEO Tony Hsieh. That counterintuitive human resource strategy and a hyper attention to customer service have helped Zappos grow into a billion-dollar-a-year retailer in less than ten years and, in the process, cultivate a cult following.

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To appreciate Nintendo's sudden dominance of the U.S. video-game market, consider: The company sold 2 million Wii players in November -- more than twice the number of Xbox 360s and PlayStation 3s combined, according to the NPD Group. And that's not counting the 700,000-plus Wii Fit exercise boards it sold in the same month. But Nintendo's success isn't limited to the Wii. Its portable DS system is the top seller in its category too -- and the No. 2 device overall (second only to the Wii). As for software, four of 2008's 10 top-selling games were made by Nintendo. In December, the company announced a deal with HarperCollins to make 100 literary classics available on the DS.

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What started as an independent animation studio in the 1920s is now a $41 billion media giant, ranging from theme parks to ABC, Pixar to Disney.com, even ESPN. And as one of the most powerful brands in the world, Disney continues to prove itself an exceptional idea factory and hit maker. Lost, Wall-E, High School Musical, and the Jonas Brothers are just a few of the projects and franchises that gripped the cultural zeitgeist in 2008.

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This irreverent ad shop has been quietly staking its claim for Boulder as the new Madison Avenue, doing not so quiet work for clients such as Volkswagen, Coke, and Burger King (think "Whopper Freakout" stunt). Most recently the shop stunned the industry when it used its mojo to win the Microsoft business, a $300 million account that seemed diametrically opposed to the coolest kids in advertising. But in Crispin fashion, the shop fully embraced its style of advertising jujitsu. The resulting "I'm a PC" campaign not only made Microsoft's nemesis, Apple, look smug but offensive.

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Once upon a time, the ad marketplace was defined by Avis vs. Hertz or Bud vs. Miller. But in 2008, nothing got Madison Avenue buzzing like Microsoft's long-awaited counter-attack to Apple's "Get a Mac" campaign -- and Apple's equally anticipated riposte.

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You expect slugger David Ortiz and American League MVP Dustin Pedroia to pad the Boston Red Sox's coffers, but Tiger Woods, Nascar's Carl Edwards, Ritz-Carlton, and -- ahem -- the New York Yankees? FSG has bought a 50% stake in Nascar's biggest team; created a startup that takes fan photos for MLB, the NBA, and college teams; sells online ads for its frenemies throughout baseball (Yanks included); and does marketing consulting for companies such as Dunkin' Donuts, which signed on last year. The ultimate home run: Nearly all of FSG's revenue conveniently falls outside MLB's revenue-sharing agreement.

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Powder to the people! That was the Dutch life- and materials-science company's novel approach in the fight against "hidden hunger," defined by the United Nations as the lack of essential vitamins and minerals (not food) affecting more than a billion people in developing countries. DSM's answer: a tasteless powder called MixMe that for 2.5 cents a day can be added to fortify staple foods. The packaging, the size of a sugar packet, can withstand extreme transport conditions. Pilot projects in Bangladesh, Nepal, and Kenya have so far benefited 250,000 people. This year, DSM expects to produce 100 million packets.

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A suspension bridge and a tree are unlikely inspirations for sneakers. But over the last year, Nike demonstrated that designing with both technology and sustainability in mind can transform everyone's performance -- that of designers, athletes, even suppliers. While the Nike Flywire -- super-lightweight footwear stitched cable-style with threads stronger than steel -- was killing at the Olympics, Nike's Considered initiative raised the bar for green apparel design. CEO Mark Parker, who started as one of Nike's first footwear designers 30 years ago, has stated that when it comes to innovation, there's no finish line.

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NPR's tote bags-and-teacups image belies a formidable digital news organization. Despite recent layoffs, NPR is building on a $200 million bequest from McDonald's heiress Joan Kroc and a doubling over the last decade of both corporate sponsorship and weekly audience. NPR now reaches more than 30 million Americans each week--more than CNN or USA Today. When other news organizations were closing foreign bureaus, they were opening them; they now gather and produce content from some 36 locations around the world, not to mention over 800 member stations that handle local news.

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Back in 2004, Crispin Porter + Bogusky became the darling of advertising when it unleashed an interactive chicken that could jig as well as he could play air guitar. The age of online viral marketing had, for good or ill, arrived. But the secret engine behind Burger King's absurdist Subservient Chicken campaign was not Crispin, which got the credit, but the Barbarian Group, a band of scrappy tech geeks who actually built the site. Five years later, Barbarian has evolved into its own force: a team of 80 programmers, developers, information architects, and motion-graphics artists who combine the experimental zeal of an MIT lab with the fine-arts mastery of a RISD.

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In its 50th-anniversary year, the $2 billion-plus private company is on pace for record revenues and profits, thanks to a number of clever new products. Gore's inLighten window screens are made with a plastic polymer. They not only let more light in but also are easier to clean. To create its Optifade camouflage for high-end hunting-gear maker Sitka, Gore researched how deer see. The result combines a macropattern to break up symmetry with a micropattern to blend into the background. And a still-unnamed fire-resistant material reduces heat transfer, is self-extinguishing, won't melt on the skin, and can add fire resistance to nylon or polyester.

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The genius of Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert is their ability to expose hypocrisy while getting laughs. In a wild election year, The Daily Show With Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report, a spin-off created by Stewart's Busboy Productions, offered up the most memorable campaign coverage. The payoff: around $120 million in ad revenue, not to mention the books and other paraphernalia that Stewart and Colbert fronted. For Comedy Central, the duo's dead-on satire gives it a late-night prestige brand. Busboy's latest gambit, Important Things With Demetri Martin, will try to extend its smart franchise to sketch comedy.

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Few instantly iconic buildings captured the public's imagination in the past year. Herzog & de Meuron's "Birds' Nest" Olympic stadium and Rem Koolhaas's headquarters for Central Chinese Television, come to mind. But for sheer quantity of dazzlers, no firm can match the venerable architectural behemoth Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. It is currently engaged in some 1,320 projects worldwide. Known for snazzy corporate headquarters, the firm also designed the elegant Cathedral of Christ the Light in Oakland, California, and the award-winning LEED Silver masterpiece for the U.S. Census Bureau. In fact, SOM won 54 awards in 2008.

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The recession has been particularly hard on retailers, except for the biggest one of all. Wal-Mart sales rose 6.5% in 2008, and its stock price jumped 19.5%. When former CEO Lee Scott -handed the reins to Mike Duke this February, he had much to be proud of, especially the way Wal-Mart has embraced sustainability. "We're not green," the never-satisfied Scott declared last March. But under his leadership, Wal-Mart got greener every day.

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Cloud computing is reshaping the software behemoth. Led by Bill Gates's replacement as chief software architect, Ray Ozzie, a new operating system for Web-based applications, code-named Red Dog, will transform Microsoft. Instead of laboring for years over some massive new upgrade, it will increasingly focus on supplying an array of cloud-based services -- and continuous revenues. Hopes are high, for example, for Live Mesh, an attempt to sync people's calendars, contacts, photos, music and other data into a seamless, ubiquitous service. Even the mighty Office Suite will soon be airborne.

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This assassin's creed: Take no prisoners. The France-based video-game developer Ubisoft followed that mantra with gusto with its proprietary graphics engine Anvil. On the strength of the Anvil-powered stealth game Assassin's Creed, Ubisoft's first-half 2008 revenue jumped more than 30%. With the same engine powering Shaun White Snowboarding (November 2008) and Prince of Persia (December 2008), Ubisoft expects 2009 sales to rise 10% to $1.6 billion.

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This Danish wind-energy company, the largest in the world, installs a wind turbine every four hours. The turbines generate energy for little money, without creating greenhouse gases, pollution or waste. Vestas serves an estimated 45 million people in 63 countries. In Denmark, wind energy already accounts for 20 percent of the country's total energy consumption (compared with 1.3 percent worldwide) -- and on windy days, its 5,000 wind turbines supply all of the electricity. In the U.S., the company has already created more than 1,200 jobs, and by 2011, Vestas expects it will have created 4,000 more jobs.

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Chevron Energy Solutions is "the Ideo of the energy sector," says business professor Andrew Hargadon, who has partnered with CES at the University of California, Davis's Energy Efficiency Center. The eight-year-old Chevron subsidiary has come up with a unique business model. It will go to a post office, a prison, or an entire school district and perform a complete efficiency retrofit on the buildings, from better insulation to new boilers. The company, which boasts 20% annual growth, is one of the largest installers of solar panels, fuel cells, and biomass projects nationwide. Projects in 30 states have saved those customers an average of 30% in energy use -- more than $1 billion to date.

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Hollywood talent agencies can no longer rely on last century's business model. CAA's most recent innovative deals cross every creative profession, from actors and athletes, to comedians and designers, to musicians and venture capitalists. When videogame pioneer Will Wright was seeking music for Spore last year, CAA connected him with another client, Brian Eno. When CAA found out that Rosario Dawson was headlining their client Electric Farm Entertainment's original Web series, their agents wedged tech client, Cisco, into the Gemini Division's plot. And in just its second year representing athletes, CAA brokered nearly $700 million worth of contracts.

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L-3 has its hands in almost every part of the military's initiative to improve soldiers' "battlefield awareness." You've probably seen images of U.S. Special Ops guys toting laptops into the mountains of Afghanistan to direct airstrikes. L-3 built some of the first such devices, called Rovers, early in the "war on terror." This year, the military will deploy L-3's Rover 5, a 3.5-pound handheld that fits into a cargo-pants pocket. The device boasts what Evan Deneris, director of Rover engineering, calls a "John Madden feature," which lets a soldier see real-time video from manned or unmanned aircraft and use a stylus to zero in on the target. On the home front, the Rover aided Hurricane Katrina rescues and the battle against California wildfires.

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Its handiwork first grabbed us in the massive, chaotic battle scenes in The Lord of the Rings. Since then, the four-time Academy Award-winning special-effects shop Weta Digital has deployed its technology in films from Wall-E to The Dark Knight (via a spin-off company called Massive that focuses on crowd creation). For this winter's The Day the Earth Stood Still, two dozen Weta designers spent six months sculpting the film's real star (sorry, Keanu): the spaceship. "To get that sense of atmosphere," senior visual-effects supervisor Joe Letteri says, "we mimicked cloud motions. The light bounces and scatters. Start one of these rays on its path, and there are millions of calculations that go on."

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How much can you improve a 51-year-old plastic toy brick? Lots. Lego has undergone a dramatic turnaround, swinging from a $300 million loss in 2004 to a $280 million profit in 2007 and continued double-digit growth last year. CEO Jørgen Vig Knudstorp launched a line of digital design programs and interactive gaming -- from a Star Wars game for the Wii to an online Mars Mission game. Lego Universe, a massive multiplayer game that will debut in 2010, encourages collaboration and allows users to order building kits based on their virtual designs.

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Emirates, the state carrier of Dubai has been profitable for 20 years running, and will have the largest long-haul fleet of any airline on earth once more of its A380s are delivered. It is outfitting first-class cabins in the new A380s with such amenities as in-flight showers, and helping to start a low-cost carrier, Flydubai, this year. Emirates pays less for fuel than the average American airline, and has lower labor costs and an incredibly efficient hub in Dubai. The end result: Emirates may remind the nostalgic of Pan Am in its heyday.

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The patient biotech giant came to prominence by developing treatments for rare genetic disorders, a process usually fraught with risk and expense. But in January, the company announced that it expects its 20% compound annual earnings growth to continue through 2011. Genzyme has recently added renal, bone, and cancer treatments. A 10-year study by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons just reported good news for the company's Carticel, a cell therapy that uses a patient's own cartilage to repair damaged knees. Says Dr. Lyle Cain Jr., an orthopedic surgeon in Birmingham, Alabama: "This is the beginning of the next generation of procedures."

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Etsy, the sizzling online bazaar for handmade goods, was launched in 2005 by three New York University students led by founder Rob Kalin; it now counts 1.8 million members in 150 countries, and 2 million listings. Etsy tripled its gross sales in 2008, to $90 million, and attracted funding from Accel Partners and Union Square Ventures. And as it has grown, Etsy has become a community, with actual and virtual meetups organized by location (Singapore, Saskatchewan), medium (papier-mâché, mosaic), and interest area (Chainmailers Guild, Lizards and Lollipops).

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Best known as a manufacturer of batteries for gadgets, nobody took China's BYD seriously as an automaker -- it only sold its first car in 2003. Then, in December, BYD began selling a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle in China for the equivalent of about $22,000 -- dramatically less, in other words, than any viable contender for the title of "paradigm-shifting EV." The specs are compelling too: a top speed of 100 mph and a 62-mile range on battery power alone. (And because it has a gas engine that recharges the batteries, range anxiety isn't a real issue.) If it can pass U.S. safety tests -- a big if -- the Chevy Volt may be licked before it's left the garage.

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Yes, it's a distant number two to Universal Music in total sales, and both labels are suffering revenue drops. But at Warner Music, the drops are small, on the order of 2% to 3% -- and the company seems to have found a model for the future. Digital sales were up 39% last year (more than Universal's), thanks in part to an MP3 effort launched in late 2007 that really got ramped up in 2008. Warner was aggressive with music social networks, including MySpace Music and an investment in iMeem, plus it partnered with Nokia to create an all-access music channel on your phone. Warner has also restructured the way it signs artists (such as James Blunt, T.I., and Paramore), turning itself into something like a venture capitalist for musicians.

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In a 33-year quest to end blindness in India, Aravind has developed everything from cheaper intraocular lenses to a 20-minute cataract surgery that allows high volume at lower cost. The network of not-for-profit hospitals and vision centers performs 300,000 eye surgeries each year -- 70% for free -- using broadband connections to on-call doctors in city hospitals for instant diagnosis. Camps in rural areas screen thousands of patients weekly. "We are going from village to village to provide eye care to the unreached," says Aravind's chairman, Dr. P. Namperumalsamy. Aravind won the 2008 Gates Award for Global Health.

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Toyota hasn't escaped the current economic cataclysm. Like its peers, it's predicting sharply lower sales for 2009. But with GM on the ropes, it's now the world's top-producing automaker. Its lean production methods and continuous-improvement strategy have been mimicked in industries from mining to retail to health care. And by betting on green, with the introduction of the Prius seven years ago, it lapped domestic automakers who put chits on cheap oil and big cars. This year will see a new Prius (many built at a plant in Mississippi) and two more hybrids; a new Lexus hybrid is reportedly in the wings. Toyota also has high hopes for its iQ ultracompact car (now available only in Japan and Europe), which seats four.

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Storage is the Achilles' heel of sustainable energy: Making electricity available when and where it's needed is half the battle, and batteries generally aren't an efficient solution. In September, Edinburgh, Scotland–based Pelamis began harvesting energy from the world's first "wave farm," tethered three miles off the coast of Portugal. Pelamis's three 140-meter-long snakelike thingies undulate on the ocean's surface, forcing fluid through hydraulic motors, which in turn drive generators to produce electricity. Twenty-five more of the machines will be added this year, bringing capacity to 21 megawatts of electricity, enough to power 15,000 to 20,000 homes. Pelamis has two UK wave farm projects in the works, one off the coast of Cornwall and one off the coast of Scotland.

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It's been possible to turn hot underground water into electricity for decades, of course. But in November Raser flipped on a first-of-its-kind geothermal plant in Beaver County, Utah. It can generate zero-emissions electricity using water that's scarcely hotter than a cup of coffee, opening up previously unusable (and far more common) low- to medium-temperature geo-thermal resources. What's more, Raser developed and built the Utah plant in under a year by using modular generators that arrive on the back of a truck, reducing construction time from the more typical five or seven years and slashing capital costs, which have historically accounted for about half the construction expense. Razer plans to add 600-plus megawatts of capacity over the next five years.

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Fast Company

Slideshow: The Fast Company 50

Even in these tough times, surprising and extraordinary efforts are under way in businesses across the globe. From politics to technology, energy, and transportation; from marketing to retail, health care, and design, each company on the following pages illustrates the power and potential of innovative ideas and creative execution. These are the kinds of enterprises that will redefine our future and point the way to a better tomorrow.

Even in these tough times, surprising and extraordinary efforts are under way in businesses across the globe. From politics to technology, energy, and transportation; from marketing to retail, health care, and design, each company on the following pages illustrates the power and potential of innovative ideas and creative execution. These are the kinds of enterprises that will redefine our future and point the way to a better tomorrow.

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