From Lost to Wall-E to Disney.com, the media giant proves itself an exceptional idea factory and hit maker. Where do its creative heads find inspiration? We peeked inside their offices to find out.

"[Disney animation legend] Joe Grant, a personal hero of mine, gave me this pencil. Even though people look at Pixar as cutting-edge, we have one foot planted in the tradition of great storytelling. This is a way of holding onto that."

"When I came to L.A., I was an actor who wanted to write, but I would do anything to avoid it. After I tore three major ligaments in my knee playing softball, I couldn't work for six months. But that forced me to focus on my writing. So when I'm stuck on a script now, this glove is a reminder that sometimes the things that look the worst ultimately lead to the best."

"My father would read to me before I went to bed every night, and he would slip his glasses into this case. I have all these great associations with the stories--science fiction and genre and fantasy. My dad was an incredible storyteller and he always loved that I wanted to be a writer. He read a book a day, if that's possible, and he and I read to each other very often. All the Oz books, the Narnia books, the Alice in Wonderland books--we'd finish one and then just dive into the next one."

"This is my first electric guitar. If I'm blocked and need to empty my head for new ideas, I crank up the volume and play. Neil Young's 'Rockin' in the Free World' is good for frustration. Inspiration is a little more Velvet Underground. Everybody knows that if they hear music coming from my office, don't come in."

"At the quarry where Michelangelo chose the stone to carve David, I picked up this piece of rock. It rests nicely on my Apple computer stand, so I see it all the time when I'm writing. Michelangelo could see through the stone to what he wanted to sculpt. That, to me, is creativity on such a mind-blowing level. If he could do that, how hard could it be to write an episodic script?"

"If you walk into my office, this picture is the first thing you see: two icons together, at the beginning of their careers. It reminds me of what you can do, what the future can hold."

What's Disney's Inspiration?

From Lost to Wall-E to Disney.com, the media giant proves itself an exceptional idea factory and hit maker. Where do its creative heads find inspiration? We peeked inside their offices to find out.

From Lost to Wall-E to Disney.com, the media giant proves itself an exceptional idea factory and hit maker. Where do its creative heads find inspiration? We peeked inside their offices to find out.

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