The 2008-2009 college football postseason kicks off December 20 with the EagleBank Bowl in D.C, the first of 34 Division I bowl games. It may not be the pros, but college ball is posting some big-league numbers.

The College Football economy is worth an estimated yearly $6 BILLION, and in 2007, the 619 SCHOOLS competing in NCAA FOOTBALL tallied a total attendance of 48,751,861.

Ohio State University had the nation's largest athletic budget last year: $109, 382, 222. That's nearly $110,000 for each of its 980 athletes.

Fox paid $330 Million to air all Bowl Championship Series games, except the Rose Bowl from 2007 to 2010.

Last Season's 32 bowl games collectively drew 1.7 million fans, and another 129 million households tuned in to TV broadcasts.

The average home-game attendance in 2007 at Texas A&M's Kyle Field: 82,207

The estimated population in 2007 of College Station, Texas -- home to Texas A&M: 80,315

WINS: Merchandise royalties for the University of Texas doubled to $8 million after it won the 2006 national championship. And New Orleans got an economic boost estimated at $400 million from hosting last year's national championship.

LOSSES: NBC pays $9 million per year for the broadcast rights to home games at Notre Dame, which went 3-9 last season. Ratings have dropped 47% since 2005.

College Football's Billions

The 2008-2009 college football postseason kicks off December 20 with the EagleBank Bowl in D.C, the first of 34 Division I bowl games. It may not be the pros, but college ball is posting some big-league numbers.

The 2008-2009 college football postseason kicks off December 20 with the EagleBank Bowl in D.C, the first of 34 Division I bowl games. It may not be the pros, but college ball is posting some big-league numbers.

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