Fast Company

MTV’s New Digital Forays

Music television no more. MTV is targeting the digital realm of video games and the Web in a dizzying array of new deals.

Flixwagon is a mobile-to-Web video platform that, over one August weekend, delivered 6 million video streams of the Jonas Brothers live.

The new Virtual Lower East Side is like Second Life, but set in New York's gritty music scene.

The print hipsters at Vice magazine create original Web videos for MTV.

Hustle & Flow director Craig Brewer is producing $5 Cover, a digitally distributed music show.

MTV acquired game maker Harmonix for $175 million in 2006. The video game Rock Band and its sequel are on track to make more than $700 million in revenue for 2008.

The TV dating show Next is transformed into an online dating platform at nextornot.com.

Real World meets Project Runway for graphic designers in Webisodes airing at mtvengineroom.com. Cosponsored by HP.

The game toolmaker Xfire allows PC gamers to find other users online easily. Acquired in 2006 for $102 million.

At dance.mtv.com, amateur dance groups from around the world post videos to be rated by users.

Via a 2007 partnership with Verizon Wireless and RealNetworks , the online music store Rhapsody America takes on iTunes.

At mysupersweet party.com, 15-year-old girls plan over-the-top birthdays online under the scrutiny of their peers.

In December 2007, megaproducer Jerry Bruckheimer signed a multiyear deal to create video games for MTV.

A partnership with Gracenote makes a vast database of song lyrics accessible online and on mobile devices.

Local search and advertising network Zvents powers MTV's Campus Daily Guides, a Yelp-like site for major college towns.

Robert Kirkham's superhero comic opera Invincible becomes an animated series to be shown on iPods, cell phones, and TVs.

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