“Phat Albert” tore a ligament in his right elbow in 2003 but has played through the pain. After the 2007 season, he consulted with Dr. Andrews and was given three options: reconstruction, arthroscopy, or rest and “self-monitoring.” He opted for the third, stating, “If it blows out, it’s going to blow out.” So far, so good. He’s an MVP candidate this year.

The speedy outfielder was no longer so lightfooted at age 41, when he injured his left shoulder sliding into first base in May 2001. Tim Raines spent months recovering from tendon and labrum surgeries, and his return to the field was short-lived.

Derek Jeter dislocated his left shoulder in April 2003. On Andrews’ recommendation, he was treated with physical therapy alone, and he was back in the lineup six weeks later.

The Royals righty couldn’t just rub a little pine tar on a torn knee ligament he suffered in the spring of 1989, so Dr. Andrews repaired it. The following year, George Brett batted .329 and was one of the highest-paid players in the league, bringing home over $2.25 million in salary.

While playing for the Blue Jays in October 1995, the longtime Brewer and future Hall of Famer had his right shoulder scoped by Andrews. In 1996, Molitor, then 40, gave new meaning to the term Silver Slugger: He won the hitting award at the DH position with 225 hits and a .341 batting average.

The smooth-hitting, guitar-playing, All-Star centerfielder had his knee scoped by Andrews in the summer of 2003. He returned in time for the playoffs, where he hit .318 and had two homers and 10 RBI, but it wasn’t enough to stop the Marlins from extending the “Curse of the Giambino,” which has prevented the Yankees from winning the World Series this decade.

Andrews fixed the slugger’s shoulder in 2004, giving him two more seasons with the Yankees and a subsequent career extension—worth $14 million per year—with the Tigers. (Sheffield hit 123 RBIs the year after surgery.)

The aging catcher had arthroscopic surgery on his problematic right knee in May 1989 (to remove loose cartilage). Carter played three more seasons. The Hall of Famer didn’t show any signs of knee trouble when chasing after Willie Randolph’s job last May.

Talk about “performance enhancing”… Clemens had labrum surgery in 1985 as a second-year pro and a year later became the first pitcher to strike out 20 batters in a game. He went on to take home seven Cy Young Awards and nearly $150 million in salary.

Frankly, all we know is that the great Rivera, perhaps the best closer in the history of baseball, at one time got a consultation from Dr. Andrews. Dr. Frank Jobe, inventor of the Tommy John surgery, performed the technique on him while he was still in the minors, and Rivera’s career of four World Series wins, more than 470 saves, and career earnings of almost $130 million speaks to both the restorative power of the Tommy John surgery, Andrews’ role as the most-sought-after second opinion in sports, and why the Yankees send so many players to see Andrews in Birmingham.

Dr. James Andrews' All-Star Baseball Team

“Phat Albert” tore a ligament in his right elbow in 2003 but has played through the pain. After the 2007 season, he consulted with Dr. Andrews and was given three options: reconstruction, arthroscopy, or rest and “self-monitoring.” He opted for the third, stating, “If it blows out, it’s going to blow out.” So far, so good. He’s an MVP candidate this year.

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